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William A. Bacon's Observatories Page Index


The Hubble Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope Launched 25 years ago

25 years ago, NASA launched the +Hubble Space Telescope.
It was then the most powerful scientific instrument in existence.
Hubble has allowed astronomers to discover that the Universe is expanding at an accelerating rate,
and is populated by countless billions of planets, stars, and galaxies.
CREDIT: NASA

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field in 3D

Famous Hubble Star Explosion Is Expanding, New Animation Reveals by Elizabeth Howell on December 2, 2014

The Eta Carinae nebula expands in images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995, 2001 and 2008.
Image used with permission by the animation authors. Credit: Hubble, NASA, ESA.
Processing and copyright: First Light, J. L. Dauvergne, P. Henarejos
Wow! One of the most famous star explosions captured by the Hubble Space Telescope
� several times � shows clear evidence of expansion in this new animation.
You can see here the Homunculus Nebula getting bigger and bigger between 1995 and 2008,
when Hubble took pictures of the Eta Carinae star system.

Animated star clusters viewed by the Hubble Space Telescope

How do we see same supernova multiple times? Because speed limit of light & gravitational lensing. #HubbleHangout

Know the Cosmos ‏@KnowTheCosmos Dec 17,2015 Models of gravitational lensing were used to predict the reappearance of the supernova. #HubbleHangout

Closeup of the Einstein Cross of Supernova Refsdal

Diagram explaining of the Einstein Cross of Supernova Refsdal

The Hubble Picture MAtrix


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The HIgh Definition Space Telescope

What’s Coming After Hubble and James Webb? The High-Definition Space Telescope
by RAMIN SKIBBA on AUGUST 12, 2015

An Artist’s conception of the proposed High-Definition Space Telescope,
which would have a giant segmented mirror and unprecedented resolution at optical and UV wavelengths.
CREDIT: (NASA/GSFC)


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The Lisa Pathfinder Mission

Lisa Pathfinder Mission Overview

Published on Nov 13, 2015 LISA Pathfinder will pave the way for future missions by testing in flight the very concept of gravitational wave detection:
it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy.
LISA Pathfinder will use the latest technology to minimise the extra forces on the test masses, and to take measurements.
The inertial sensors, the laser metrology system, the drag-free control system and an ultra-precise micro-propulsion system
make this a highly unusual mission.
LISA Pathfinder is an ESA mission, which will also carry a NASA payload. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

Highly sensitive core of LISA Pathfinder completed

Listening to the 'sound' of the #Universe – highly sensitive core of LISA Pathfinder completed

Optical Measurement System for LISA Pathfinder - Towards a Gravitational Wave Observatory in Space

Published on Jun 24, 2013 "We are really excited that the LISA Pathfinder mission is well underway for the launch date of 2015," said Dr Christian Killow. He helped to test a key component of LISA Pathfinder: the optical bench, part of the first sophisticated laser interferometer ever to fly in space. This technology will allow the construction of spaceborne gravitational wave observatories to detect binary neutron stars, black holes, and even the big bang itself. The optical bench of the LISA Pathfinder mission passed with flying colors extensive testing at the Institute for Gravitational Research at the University of Glasgow. Scientists assured that the high-precision measurement system is ready to survive tremendous forces up to 35 times the gravitational acceleration on Earth during rocket launch. http://www.elisa-ngo.org/articles/lis... LISA/LPF website: University of Glasgow/IGR website: http://www.physics.gla.ac.uk/igr/inde... Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics website: ESA website: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Spa... UK Space Agency website: http://www.bis.gov.uk/ukspaceagency/m... Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

ESA: LISA Pathfinder Encapsulation for Rocket Launch Begins

LISA Pathfinder is being encapsulated within the half-shells of the Vega rocket fairing on November 16, 2015, at the Centre Spatial Guyanais in Kourou, French Guiana. LISA Pathfinder will test the fundamental technologies and instrumentation needed for such an observatory, demonstrating them for the first time in space. LISA Pathfinder is currently scheduled for launch with Arianespace flight VV06—the sixth launch of Europe's small Vega ...

The Lisa Pathfinder Mission Ready to Launch

LISA Pathfinder being readied for launch in December 2015. This mission will test the fundamental technologies
and instrumentation needed for future gravitational-wave observatories in space.

Spacecraft Launches to Test the Hunt for Ripples in the Fabric of Spacetime
by NANCY ATKINSON on DECEMBER 3, 2015

Published on Dec 2, 2015 Liftoff of Vega VV06 carrying LISA Pathfinder from Europe's Spaceport, French Guiana, at 04:04 GMT/05:04 CET on 3 December 2015.

Lisa Pathfinder mission overview

Published on Nov 13, 2015 LISA Pathfinder will pave the way for future missions by testing in flight the very concept of gravitational wave detection:
it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy.
LISA Pathfinder will use the latest technology to minimise the extra forces on the test masses, and to take measurements.
The inertial sensors, the laser metrology system, the drag-free control system and an ultra-precise micro-propulsion system make
this a highly unusual mission. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA mission, which will also carry a NASA payload. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

Lisa Pathfinder craft

This exploded view shows the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft in its entirety. The white- and gold-hued science module carries
the payload with the test masses and their electrode housings, the optical bench interferometer, and vacuum enclosure.
Credit: ESA/ATG medialab.

Lisa Pathfinder craft the complete diagram

Lisa Pathfinder Free & floating!!

First LISA Pathfinder test mass released inside its housing. 2nd planned for tomorrow.(Feb.,16, 2016)

LISA Pathfinder - Window on the gravitational universe

Published on Nov 25, 2015 LISA Pathfinder’s name, Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, clearly indicates the role of precursor
that this mission plays. Its goal is to validate the technology required to detect gravitational waves from space.
Gravitational waves will open a new door in our understanding of the Universe, and at the same time help to verify
Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. LISA Pathfinder will be launched early December 2015 on a Vega rocket from Kourou in French Guiana. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


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The Jason Ocean Observatory Mission

The Jason Launch Vehicle

SpaceX Falcon 9 erected at Vandenberg AFB launch pad in California in advance of Jason-3 launch for NASA on Jan. 17, 2016.
Credit: SpaceX

The Jason Mission Launches, January 17, 2016

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is seen as it launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base Space Launch Complex 4 East
with the Jason-3 spacecraft onboard, Sunday, Jan. 17, 2016, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Jason-3,
an international mission led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), will help continue U.S.-European
satellite measurements of global ocean height changes.
Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Liftoff of Jason-3

Published on Jan 17, 2016 A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 4 at Vandenberg Air Force Base carrying the Jason-3 spacecraft.
Liftoff was at 10:42 a.m. PST (1:42 p.m. EST). NASA launched Jason-3 into orbit for NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
the French space agency and EUMETSAT, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

SpaceX Falcon 9 First stage approaches center of landing droneship in Pacific Ocean. Credit: SpaceX

SpaceX Falcon 9 first stage tips over and explodes on Pacific ocean droneship after landing
leg fails to lock in place on Jan 17, 2016. Credit: SpaceX See landing video below

Remnants of Falcon 9 first stage after crash landing on barge at sea.
Landing leg failed to lock in place causing rocket to tip over and explode. Credit: SpaceX

The Jason Artist Concept

Artists concept of Jason-3 in orbit. Credit: NASA/NOAA

Jason-3: Studying the Earth's Oceans from Space

Published on Jan 15, 2016 To provide scientists with essential information about global and regional changes in the seas,
NASA will launch the Jason-3 satellite from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

The Japanese ASTRO-H Xray Telescope

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Launch of Japanese H-IIA Rocket with ASTRO-H Onboard

Published on Feb 17, 2016 A Japanese H-IIA rocket has successfully launched from the Tanegashima Space Center at 08:45 UTC,
February 17th 2016 carrying the ASTRO-H payload into orbit. ASTRO-H is an X-ray astronomy payload satellite
commissioned by JAXA for studying extremely energetic processes in the universe. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

Japan's Astro-H X-ray observatory launches from Tanegashima Space Center on Feb. 17, 2016. Credit: JAXA via NASA There's a new set of X-ray eyes in the sky. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Astro-H X-ray observatory launched to Earth orbit
today (Feb. 17) at 3:45 a.m. EST (0845 GMT; 5:45 p.m. local time in Japan) atop an H-IIA rocket from the Tanegashima Space Center. Astro-H separated from the rocket about 14 minutes after liftoff. The satellite's solar arrays deployed as planned,
and the spacecraft is currently in good health, JAXA officials said. [ - See more

This illustration shows the locations and energy ranges of Astro-H science instruments and their associated telescopes. One keV equals 1,000 electron volts, which is hundreds of times the energy of visible light. Credit: JAXA/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center SEE MORE

JAXA writes off X-ray astronomy satellite without restoring contact THE ASAHI SHIMBUN

Chikara Harada, right, head of the Space Tracking and Communications Center of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA),
responds to a question in a news conference in Tokyo on April 28 while using a model of an X-ray astronomy satellite Hitomi.
Next to him is Saku Tsuneta, director of JAXA’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science. (Wataru Sekita)


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The Subaru Space Telescope

Subaru Telescope Spots Galaxies From The Early Universe by Matt Williams on November 21, 2014


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The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE

Introduction To The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE

The Webb Telescope Website!!!!!

The Webb Telescope: Mission Brief

ScienceCasts: Readying the Webb Telescope for Launch

Published on Apr 17, 2017 Visit for more. Stringent testing is underway to prove the James Webb Space Telescope can handle an Earth-shaking take-off and still capture the universe’s first light while deeply ensconced in the hyper-cold of space.

Webb Telescope Deployment Sequence

Published on Jun 30, 2016 NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope,
the most powerful infrared science observatory ever to be sent into space.
From its orbit nearly a million miles from Earth, Webb will study some of the most distant objects in the universe
-- but first it has to get there. Webb will be folded up inside the rocket that launches it into space,
gradually unfurling as it travels to its destination beyond the Moon. This video depicts Webb's journey into orbit,
capturing both its travel time and distance and its transformation as it deploys. CREDITS: Produced by NASA and Northrop Grumman Narration: Lee Arenberg Writer and Director: Jonathan Arenberg Script Consultants: Jon Lawrence, Carl Starr, Marc Kirkpatrick, Joel Green, Andy Salvatore, Connie Reese, and Bill Morelli Technical Consultants: Brandyn Bok, Jonathan Lowe, Michale Mesarch, and Karen Richon Animation: Faren Mandel, Vladimir Sierra, Tony Carrillo, and Juan Bautista Voice Direction and Recording: Dan Koblosh Editing and Music direction: Bob Jaques Astronomical Images: Special Thanks: Arianespace Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

NASA Engineers Conduct Low Light Test on New Technology for Webb Telescope

NASA engineers inspect a new piece of technology developed for the James Webb Space Telescope,
the micro shutter array, with a low light test at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
Developed at Goddard to allow Webb's Near Infrared Spectrograph to obtain spectra of more than 100 objects in the
universe simultaneously, the micro shutter array uses thousands of tiny shutters to capture spectra from selected objects
of interest in space and block out light from all other sources.

Who's excited for the James Webb Space Telescope?More info: bit.ly/1Xzc2ex

Posted by I fucking love science on Saturday, November 28, 2015

The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE Launch Vehicle

The Ariane5 lifting off from Kourou in French Guiana. Image: ESA/Arianespace.

Flight VA228: The successful launch of Intelsat 29e, and Ariane 5’s 70th success in a row

Published on Jan 27, 2016 Arianespace has successfully launched Intelsat 29e for the international operator Intel-sat.
Arianespace’s first launch of the year, and its 56th performed for Intelsat, took place on
January 27 at 8:20 pm (local time) from the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana.
This 70th success in a row for Ariane 5 initiates another ambitious year for Arianespace,
which is planning to launch up to eight Ariane 5 missions during 2016. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

James Webb Space Telescope Deployment In Detail

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Published on Apr 8, 2014 This video shows in-depth what will happen when James Webb Space Telescope deploys after launch. For more information, see this description on our website: http://jwst.nasa.gov/faq.html#howdeploy Download video: http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (67 MB .wmv) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (169 MB .wmv) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (271 MB .wmv) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (92 MB .mp4) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (172 MB .mp4) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (118.9 MB iPad .mp4) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (132 MB Nexus 7 .mp4) Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

More livable than Earth? New index sizes up the habitability of alien exoplanets
by ALAN BOYLE on OCTOBER 5, 2015

NASA’s James Webb Telescope, shown in this artist’s conception,
will provide more information about previously detected exoplanets. A new habitability index
is aimed at helping the Webb team prioritize its search.
Credit: NASA

Click Here for the James Webb Observatory




The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE Under Construction

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Into the Unknown

Published on Dec 12, 2016 Into the Unknown tells the story of the building of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope – a revolutionary observatory, 100 times more powerful and the scientific successor to the Hubble Telescope. Launching in late 2018, Webb will reveal a universe we have never seen before and is poised to answer questions that have intrigued us for thousands of years: How did the universe begin? Where did we come from? Are we alone? Armed with dynamic scenes of construction, fascinating conversations with scientists and engineers and stunning visuals, Into the Unknown offers an in-depth look at one of the most daring scientific missions ever attempted. A story for all ages, this film captures the wonder of the cosmos and the timeless human desire to understand our place within the universe. The Northrop Grumman Foundation, in partnership with filmmaker Nathaniel Kahn, developed this documentary as a resource for teachers, students and space enthusiasts around the world to enjoy. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

NASA Webb Telescope Construction Leaps Forward with Delivery
of Mirror Holding Backbone Flight Structure
by KEN KREMER on OCTOBER 8, 2015

View showing actual flight structure of mirror backplane unit for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
that holds 18 segment primary mirror array and secondary mirror mount at front, in stowed-for-launch configuration.
JWST is being assembled here by technicians inside the world’s largest cleanroom at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Up close view of actual side wing backplane of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
that will hold 3 of the observatory’s 18 primary mirrors, as technicians work inside cleanroom
at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Side view of flight unit mirror backplane assembly structure for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
that holds primary mirror array and secondary mirror mount in stowed-for-launch configuration.
JWST is being assembled technicians inside the cleanroom at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Credit: Ken Kremer.com

First Mirror Installed on NASA’s Webb Telescope, Final Assembly Phase Starts by Ken Kremer on November 25, 2015

The James Webb Space Telescope team successfully installed the first flight mirror onto the telescope structure
at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn Story/photos updated

Inside a massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
the James Webb Space Telescope Team prepared for the first flight mirror’s installation onto the telescope structure.
Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

An engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center worked to install the first flight mirror onto the telescope structure at
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Credits:
NASA/Chris Gunn

AEngineers practiced mirror installation techniques and processing using a spare primary mirror on JWST’s “Pathfinder”
backplane and secondary mirror tripod assembly in 2014 inside the clean room at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Secondary mirror at top. Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Close-up view of spare primary mirrors installed on JWST’s “Pathfinder” backplane structure
during practice session in 2014 inside the clean room at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Gold coated flight spare of a JWST primary mirror segment made of beryllium
and used for test operations inside the NASA Goddard clean room. Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Time-lapse: The Assembly of the James Webb Space Telescope Primary Mirror

Published on Feb 11, 2016 This time-lapse shows the assembly of the primary mirror of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. Assembly was completed on February 3, 2016.
JWST is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built.
Webb will study many phases in the history of our universe, including the formation of solar systems capable of supporting
life on planets similar to Earth, as well as the evolution of our own solar system. It’s targeted to launch from French Guiana aboard
an Ariane 5 rocket in 2018. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, ESA (European Space Agency) and the
Canadian Space Agency. Download video: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/det... Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


Artist’s concept of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with Sunshield at bottom Credit: Ken Kremer.com

JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE TAKES THE GLOVES OFF

Behold, the mighty primary mirror of the James Webb Space Telescope, in all its gleaming glory!
Image: NASA/Chris Gunn

The James Webb Space Telescope in the clean room at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Image: NASA/Chris Gunn NASA groups JWST’s science objectives into four areas:
  • infrared vision that acts like a time-machine, giving us a look at the first stars and galaxies to form in the Universe,
    over 13 billion years ago.
  • a comparative study of the stately spiral and elliptical galaxies of our age with the faintest, earliest galaxies to form in the Universe.
  • a probing gaze through clouds of dust, to watch stars and planets being born.
  • a look at extrasolar planets, and their atmospheres, keeping an eye out for biomarkers.

WEBB TELESCOPE GETS ITS SCIENCE INSTRUMENTS INSTALLED

In this rare view, the James Webb Space Telescope team crane lifted the science instrument package
for installation into the telescope structure. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

In this rare view, the James Webb Space Telescope team crane lifted the science instrument package
for installation into the telescope structure. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

This side shot shows a glimpse inside a massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in
Greenbelt, Maryland where the James Webb Space Telescope team worked meticulously to complete the science instrument package installation.
Credits: NASA/Desiree Stover

Up close view shows cone shaped Aft Optics Subsystem (AOS) standing at center of Webb telescopes 18 segment primary mirror
at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. ISIM science instrument module will be installed
inside truss structure below. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Up close side-view of newly exposed gold coated primary mirrors installed onto mirror backplane holding structure of
NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
on May 3, 2016. Aft optics subsystem stands upright at center of 18 mirror segments between stowed secondary mirror mount booms.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

All 18 gold coated primary mirrors of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope are seen fully unveiled after removal of protective covers
installed onto the backplane structure, as technicians work inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. The secondary mirror mount booms are folded down into stowed for launch configuration. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Time-Lapse Tilting of Webb Telescope's Primary Mirror

Published on May 4, 2016 The 18-segment primary mirror of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope was raised into vertical alignment
in the largest clean room at the agency's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, on May 4, 2016. The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb will study many phases in the history of our universe,
including the formation of solar systems capable of supporting life on planets similar to Earth, as well as the evolution of our own solar system.
It’s targeted to launch from French Guiana aboard an Ariane 5 rocket in 2018. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners,
ESA (European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency. Learn more at: Goddard Space Flight Center Nasa's webb telescope page Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Francis Reddy, Syneren Technologies Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: Or find us on Twitter: Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

World's Largest Space Telescope Is Complete, Expected to Launch in 2018 By Sarah Lewin, Staff Writer | November 2, 2016 01:01pm ET

JWST is Coming to a Lagrangian Point Near You!

James Webb Space Telescope Trailer

NASA Webb Telescope Structure is Sound After Vibration Testing Detects Anomaly

The 18-segment gold coated primary mirror of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is raised into vertical alignment in the largest clean room at the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, on Nov. 2, 2016. The secondary mirror mount booms are folded down into stowed for launch configuration. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Technicians work on the James Webb Space Telescope in the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, on Nov. 2, 2016, as the completed golden primary mirror and observatory structure stands gloriously vertical on a work stand, reflecting incoming light from the area and observation deck. Credit: Ken Kremer/

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope placed inside a “clean tent” in Nov. 2016 to protect it from dust and dirt as engineers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland transport it out of the relatively dust-free cleanroom and into a shirtsleeve environment to conduct vibration and acoustics tests to confirm it is fit for launch in 2018. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn

All 18 gold coated primary mirrors of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope are seen fully unveiled after removal of protective covers installed onto the backplane structure, as technicians work inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. The secondary mirror mount booms are folded down into stowed for launch configuration . Credit: Ken Kremer/

Up close side-view of newly exposed gold coated primary mirrors installed onto mirror backplane holding structure of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. Aft optics subsystem stands upright at center of 18 mirror segments between stowed secondary mirror mount booms. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Ken Kremer/Universe Today reflecting in and about the golden mirrors of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope which will peer back 13.5 Billion years to unravel the mysteries off the formation of the early Universe and tell us how our place in the Universe came to be. Credit: Ken Kremer/

NASA Webb Telescope Resumes Rigorous Vibration Qualification Tests

NASA engineers and technicians position the James Webb Space Telescope (inside a large tent) onto the shaker table used for vibration testing. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn


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The Rosat X-RAY Observatory

The Rosat X-RAY Observatory Spacecraft

An artist’s impression of ROSAT, a satellite X-ray telescope launched 1 June 1990,
on what was initially designed as an 18-month mission. ROSAT actually operated until 12 February 1999
and re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere on 23 October 2011.
Image credit: DLR.

A new view of the X-ray sky

This projection shows the sky distribution of 2RXS sources in Galactic coordinates.
The size of each dot scales with the source count rate (brightness) and the colour represents the X-ray colour.
Image credit: © MPE. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) have revisited the all-sky survey carried out by the ROSAT satellite,
to create a new image of the sky in at X-ray wavelengths. Along with this a revised and extended version of the catalogue
of bright and faint point-like sources will be released. The now published “2RXS catalogue” provides the deepest and cleanest X-ray
all-sky survey to date, which will only be superseded with the launch of the next generation X-ray survey satellite,
eROSITA, currently being completed at MPE.


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O B S E R V A T O R I E S!

Here is the new planck and Herschel telescopes!


Here is a web site for up to date virtual observations Visit the Virtual Planet

Visit the main site for the virtual planet Additional virtual planet stuff

Another Virtual Observatory It's Heavens Above.com

Click Heree World Wind lets you zoom from satellite altitude into
any place on Earth. Leveraging Landsat satellite imagery and Shuttle
Radar Topography Mission data, World Wind lets you experience Earth
terrain in visually rich 3D, just as if you were really there.

Here is nasa's Scientific Visualization Studio

This is NASA's Multi spectral Observatory The Virtual Observatory

This site specializes in introductory material Introduction to Planetary Nubulae

From this site you can explore the clementine Photos the establishment lets you view! The Clementine site

You can monitor Nasa's Lunar Prospector mission form here Lunar Prospector Exploration Site

From this site, you can explore the Solar System The Internet orrey


This section helps you to observe the earth

This site gives you views that Satellites have of the earth Military Satellite Earth observatory simulation

Here are links to the Hubble Space Telescope Institute

The Hubble Space Telescope has returned many wonders in its 25 years of service to humanity.

Space Telescope Institute The Hubble Space Telescope Institute

here is the Website for ESA's Hubble website

And this is ESA's Portal to the Universe!

Photos of Nebulae arranged by category A Hubble observation page

Hubble's latest photos The Hubble latest Photos






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The Chandra X-RAY OBSERVATRY

Stellar Evolution from the Chandra x-ray Observatory

July 23, 1999 - Launch of Chandra X-ray Observatory

July 23, 2014 marks the 15th anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia
from Kennedy Space Center on July 23, 1999, Chandra took its place among NASA’s “Great Observatories” and with its unique capability for producing
sub-arcsecond X-ray images, it has revealed stunning discovery after stunning discovery.
The Chandra program is managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama and is operated by the Smithsonian's Astrophysical
Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Image credit: NASA Last Updated: July 30, 2015 Editor: Lee Mohon

July 23, 1999, Chandra X-ray Observatory Awaits Deployment

This 70mm frame shows the 50,162-pound Chandra X-ray Observatory before it was tilted upward for its release from the
Space Shuttle Columbia's payload bay on July 23, 1999, just a few hours following the shuttle's arrival in Earth orbit.
Chandra was spring-ejected from a cradle in the payload bay at 6:47 a.m. Central time.
Commander Eileen Collins, the first female Shuttle Commander, maneuvered Columbia to a safe distance away from the telescope
as an internal timer counted down to the first of a two-phase ignition of the solid-fuel Inertial Upper Stage (IUS).
The IUS lit up as scheduled at 7:47 a.m., and a few minutes later, shut down as planned, sending Chandra on a highly elliptical orbit
which was refined over the next few weeks by a series of firings of telescope thrusters, designed to place Chandra in an orbit
about 6900 x 87,000 statute miles above the Earth.

In August 2015, Chandra will pass the 16th anniversary of another milestone in the mission – the release of the “First Light” images
from the telescope. As of July 1st, 2015, Chandra has traveled over 17 billion miles while completing about 2,200 orbits of the Earth.
Chandra has made over 14,000 observations over the last 16 years. The targets include objects as close as the Earth and as distant as black holes
near the edge of the observable universe.

Image Credit: NASA/JSC

Artist illustration of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the most sensitive X-ray telescope ever built. Credit: NASA/CXC/NGST

Chandra Movie Captures Expanding Debris from a Stellar Explosion

When the star that created this supernova remnant exploded in 1572, it was so bright that it was visible during the day.
And though he wasn’t the first or only person to observe this stellar spectacle, the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe wrote a book
about his extensive observations of the event, gaining the honor of it being named after him. In modern times, astronomers have observed the debris field from this explosion − what is now known as Tycho’s supernova remnant −
using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, the NSF’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and many other telescopes.
Today, they know that the Tycho remnant was created by the explosion of a white dwarf star, making it part of the so-called
Type Ia class of supernovas used to track the expansion of the Universe. Since much of the material being flung out from the shattered star has been heated by shock waves − similar to sonic booms from supersonic planes −
passing through it, the remnant glows strongly in X-ray light. Astronomers have now used Chandra observations from 2000 through 2015 to create
the longest movie of the Tycho remnant’s X-ray evolution over time, using five different images. This shows the expansion from the explosion is still
continuing about 450 years later, as seen from Earth’s vantage point roughly 10,000 light years away. By combining the X-ray data with some 30 years of observations in radio waves with the VLA, astronomers have also produced a movie,
using three different images. Astronomers have used these X-ray and radio data to learn new things about this supernova and its remnant.
The researchers measured the speed of the blast wave at many different locations around the remnant. The large size of the remnant enables
this motion to be measured with relatively high precision. Although the remnant is approximately circular, there are clear differences in the speed
of the blast wave in different regions. The speed in the right and lower right directions is about twice as large as that in the left and the upper
left directions. This difference was also seen in earlier observations.
This range in speed of the blast wave’s outward motion is caused by differences in the density of gas surrounding the supernova remnant.
This causes an offset in position of the explosion site from the geometric center, determined by locating the center of the circular remnant.
The astronomers found that the size of the offset is about 10% of the remnant’s current radius, towards the upper left of the geometric center.
The team also found that the maximum speed of the blast wave is about 12 million miles per hour.
Offsets such as this between the explosion center and the geometric center could exist in other supernova remnants.
Understanding the location of the explosion center for Type Ia supernovas is important because it narrows the search region for a surviving
companion star. Any surviving companion star would help identify the trigger mechanism for the supernova, showing that the white dwarf pulled
material from the companion star until it reached a critical mass and exploded. The lack of a companion star would favor the other main trigger
mechanism, where two white dwarfs merge causing the critical mass to be exceeded, leaving no star behind.
The significant offset from the center of the explosion to the remnant’s geometric center is a relatively recent phenomenon.
For the first few hundred years of the remnant, the explosion’s shock was so powerful that the density of gas it was running into did not
affect its motion. The density discrepancy from the left side to the right has increased as the shock moved outwards,
causing the offset in position between the explosion center and the geometric center to grow with time.
So, if future X-ray astronomers, say 1,000 years from now, do the same observation, they should find a much larger offset.
A paper describing these results has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters and is available online.
The authors are Brian Williams (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and Universities Space Research Association),
Laura Chomiuk (Michigan State University), John Hewitt (University of North Florida), John Blondin (North Carolina State University),
Kazimierz Borkowski (NCSU), Parviz Ghavamian (Towson University), Robert Petre (GSFC), and Stephen Reynolds (NCSU). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.
The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra's science and flight operations.


Image credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/GSFC/B. Williams et al; Optical: DSS; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA Read More from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. For more Chandra images, multimedia and related materials, visit: Last Updated: May 13, 2016 Editor: Lee Mohon

Deepest X-ray Image Ever Reveals Black Hole Treasure Trove

Press Image and Caption An unparalleled image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory gives astronomers the best look yet at the growth of black holes over billions of years beginning soon after the Big Bang. This is the deepest X-ray image ever obtained, collected with about 7 million seconds, or eleven and a half weeks, of Chandra observing time. The image comes from what is known as the Chandra Deep Field-South. The central region of the image contains the highest concentration of supermassive black holes ever seen, equivalent to about 5,000 objects that would fit into the area of the full Moon and about a billion over the entire sky. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/B.Luo et al. Images and a podcast about the findings are available at: For more Chandra images, multimedia and related materials, visit: Media contacts: Megan Watzke Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, Mass. 617-496-7998 Megan Watzke

Milky Way’s Black Hole Shows Signs of Increased Chatter

Three orbiting X-ray space telescopes have detected an increased rate of X-ray flares from the usually quiet giant black hole at the center
of our Milky Way galaxy after new long-term monitoring. Scientists are trying to learn whether this is normal behavior that was unnoticed due
to limited monitoring, or these flares are triggered by the recent close passage of a mysterious, dusty object. By combining information from long monitoring campaigns by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA’s XMM-Newton, with observations by the
Swift satellite, astronomers were able to carefully trace the activity of the Milky Way’s supermassive black hole over the last 15 years.
The supermassive black hole, a.k.a. Sagittarius A*, weighs in at slightly more than 4 million times the mass of the Sun.
X-rays are produced by hot gas flowing toward the black hole. The new study reveals that Sagittarius A* (Sgr A* for short) has been producing one bright X-ray flare about every ten days.
However, within the past year, there has been a ten-fold increase in the rate of bright flares from Sgr A*, at about one every day.
This increase happened soon after the close approach to Sgr A* by a mysterious object called G2.
“For several years, we’ve been tracking the X-ray emission from Sgr A*. This includes also the close passage of this dusty object”
said Gabriele Ponti of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany. “A year or so ago, we thought it had absolutely no effect
on Sgr A*, but our new data raise the possibility that that might not be the case."
Originally, astronomers thought G2 was an extended cloud of gas and dust. However, after passing close to Sgr A* in late 2013,
its appearance did not change much, apart from being slightly stretched by the gravity of the black hole.
This led to new theories that G2 was not simply a gas cloud, but instead a star swathed in an extended dusty cocoon.
“There isn’t universal agreement on what G2 is,” said Mark Morris of the University of California at Los Angeles.
“However, the fact that Sgr A* became more active not long after G2 passed by suggests that the matter coming off of G2 might have caused
an increase in the black hole’s feeding rate.” While the timing of G2’s passage with the surge in X-rays from Sgr A* is intriguing astronomers see other black holes that seem to behave
like Sgr A*. Therefore, it’s possible this increased chatter from Sgr A* may be a common trait among black holes and unrelated to G2.
For example, the increased X-ray activity could be due to a change in the strength of winds from nearby massive stars that are feeding material
to the black hole. “It’s too soon to say for sure, but we will be keeping X-ray eyes on Sgr A* in the coming months,” said co-author Barbara De Marco,
also of Max Planck. “Hopefully, new observations will tell us whether G2 is responsible for the changed behavior or if the new flaring is
just part of how the black hole behaves.”
The analysis included 150 Chandra and XMM-Newton observations pointed at the center of the Milky Way over the last 15 years,
extending from September 1999 to November 2014. An increase in the rate and brightness of bright flares from Sgr A* occurred after mid-2014,
several months after the closest approach of G2 to the huge black hole.
If the G2 explanation is correct, the spike in bright X-ray flares would be the first sign of excess material falling onto the black hole because
of the cloud’s close passage. Some gas would likely have been stripped off the cloud, and captured by the gravity of Sgr A*.
It then could have started interacting with hot material flowing towards the black hole, funneling more gas toward the black hole that could later
be consumed by Sgr A*.
A paper on these findings has been accepted by the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. A preprint is available online.
NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.
The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra's science and flight operations.
Image credit: NASA/CXC/MPE/G. Ponti et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss Read More from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. For more Chandra images, multimedia and related materials, visit: Last Updated: Sept. 23, 2015 Editor: Lee Mohon

Chandra Spots Two Cosmic Heavy-Hitters at Once

Composite view of the collision between galaxy clusters Abell 3411 and Abell 3412 . Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/R. van Weeren et al./NAOJ/Subaru

Composite view of the collision between galaxy clusters Abell 3411 and Abell 3412 . Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/R. van Weeren et al./NAOJ/Subaru

Image of radio waves produce by the collision between Abell 3411 and Abell 3412. Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO/R. van Weeren et al. ts/m

DEEPEST X-RAY IMAGE EVER MADE CONTAINS MYSTERIOUS EXPLOSION

A mysterious flash of X-rays has been discovered by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory in the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. Credit: NASA/Chandra/Harvard

X-ray (left) and optical (right) images of the space around the X-ray source, made with Chandra and the Hubble Space Telescope, respectively. Credit: NASA/CXC/F. Bauer et al.

Still image of the X-ray source observed by Chandra, showing the captured flare up at bottom Credit: NASA/CXC/Pontifical Catholic Univ./F.Bauer et al.

Further Reading:Chandra, PennState


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Observatories!

Observatories section Table of Contents

Introduction to Observatories!

Submit your own Observing request!!!! Bradford Robotic Telescope Observatory,

Another place to rent time on a telescope Arnie Rosner of Arizonia

This site for The X-ray observatory Chandra

Another online observatory is: It's Slooh.com!

Rent time for online observing, Light Buckets.com

Here is the link to Villanova University's Astronomy Department

The Astronomy Department at Villanova, Villanova, PA Villanova's Astronomy Department

The Cincinnati observatory the Birthplace of american astronomy
See through the oldest public telescope in the country.

Web site The website of the world's largest telscope under construction

Click here for Northern Virgina's Sun gazer net

Click here for NSF-OPP Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

Click here for DASI(Degree angular Scale Interferometer) Home Page

Click here for European Sothern Observatory"

Here is the web page for the Sub millimeter array main page

Here is: The soho OBSERVATORY main page

Here is the soho's latest image:


Here is the main page for Solar Dynamics Observatory

HERE IS the latest sdo/aia image:


A night in VLT and ALMA observatories (sound also recorded on location)
from Jordi Busque


A night in VLT and ALMA observatories (sound also recorded on location) from Jordi Busque on Vimeo.

The Very Large Telescope (VLT) consists of four individual telescopes, each with a primary mirror 8.2 m across and four movable Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of 1.8 m aperture. It is located on cerro Paranal (2635m), in northern Chile.

The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is the largest ground-based astronomical project consisting of 66 12-metre (39 ft), and 7-metre (23 ft) diameter radio telescopes. It is also the world's highest array of radio telescopes at 5,000 metres altitude in the Chajnantor plateau, northern Chile.

Images and sounds recorded on location by Jordi Busqué.

For more information, please visit www.jordibusque.com


The Very Large Telescope (VLT) consists of four individual telescopes, each with a primary mirror 8.2 m across
and four movable Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of 1.8 m aperture. It is located on cerro Paranal (2635m), in northern Chile.

The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is the largest ground-based astronomical project consisting of 66 12-metre (39 ft),
and 7-metre (23 ft) diameter radio telescopes. It is also the world's highest array of radio telescopes at 5,000 metres altitude
in the Chajnantor plateau, northern Chile.

Images and sounds recorded on location by Jordi Busqu�.

For more information, please visit jordibusque.com

Glowing Galaxies Shine Above Trance-Like Telescopic Timelapse
by Elizabeth Howell on September 16, 2014


StarryNights - some of the largest observatories in time-lapse from Jan Hattenbach on Vimeo.

StarryNights is a collection of astronomical time-lapse videos recorded of the last three years.

From 2011 to 2014 we have been visiting astronomical observatories in Chile and La Palma - with our telescope and some cameras. This video features a compilation of our time-lapse videos we recorded.

The following observatories/telescopes appear in this video:

La Silla Observatory, ESO, Chile (3,6m ESO telescope, NTT telescope, MPG/ESO 2,2m telescope, Danish 1,54m telescope, among others)

Observatorio Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), La Palma, Spain (10,4m Gran Telescopo Canarias, NOT telescope, William Herschel 4,2m telescope, Liverpool telescope, Swedish 1m solar telescope, 17m MAGIC telescopes, among others)

Las Campanas Observatory, Chile (Magellan 6,5m twin telescopes, among others)

Paranal Observatory, ESO, Chile (Very Large Telescope, VST)

The time-lapses were a byproduct of our visual observing - because obviously, these sites are also the best in the world for visual observing and astrophotography. If you ever have the chance to spend a night at one of these observatories, consider yourself very lucky!

Thanks are due to following institutions for making this video possible:

European Southern Observatory (ESO)
Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, USA
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain


We often speak of the discoveries and data flowing from astronomical observatories, which makes it easy to forget the cool factor.
Think of it � huge telescopes are probing the universe under crystal-clear skies, because astronomers need the dark skies to get their work done.
That�s what makes this astronomical video by Jan Hattenbach such a treat. He�s spent the past three years catching stunning video shots at observatories
all over the world, showing timelapses of the Milky Way galaxy and other celestial objects passing overhead.


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This section for the Mt Graham National observatory...

The original site.... CLICK HERE!

And the New site.... CLICK HERE

This site for Skyview Virtual Observatory

Click here for Sungazer Comets

And here for The NSF Digital Sky

Here is the Hubble Space Institute's STSCI Digitized Sky Survey"

Here is the Hubble Institue's Hubble Heritage Institute


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This section for the Keck Observatory

This is the site for the Keck Observatory On top of Mauna Kea!!

Thisis the plan to develop Mauna Kea in the Future CLICK HERE!

And here is Keck Observatory's Main page

Click here for Keck's Titan's page

Web cams at the Keck Observatory! CLICK HERE!

Here is The thiry meter telescope


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This section for Southern California Astronomy

Another observatory is The Griffith Observatory

Here is a famous observatory
Mt Wilson Observatory

And the view from their tower cam!


And here for The Jet propulsion Labortary

And here is an Astronomical Society Astronomical Society of the Desert

Here is LA astronomical society

And here is LA Sidewalk Astronomers

and here is Mt Wilson Obseravotry

Here is Virtual Tour Of Mt. Wilson Observatory

Another society is Orange County Astronomy

Submit your own observing request!!!!! U of Iowa Automated Telescope Obseratory


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The Gemni Observotoies

The Gemni observatory

Gemini news releases

The Gemini Planet Imager

The Gemni Observotoies

The Observatories from Alex Cherney on Vimeo.


The Observatories
from Alex Cherney Plus 1 week ago Not Yet Rated
in June 2011 I was very lucky to attend the inaugural STARMUS festival on Tenerife
and observe with the largest single-mirror optical telescope on the planet - 10-metre GranTeCan.
After spending five days at STARMUS listening to and chatting with the great astrophysicists and space legends
I decided to dedicate more time to astronomy science and film the observatories around the world.
This video, which was selected as the winner of the 2014 STARMUS astrophotography competition
(press announcement: tiny.cc/838tkx), is the result of over three years of work and includes the images of the following observatories:
* Roque De Los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma; * Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, Murchison, Australia; * Australia Telescope Compact Array, Narrarbri, Australia; * Parkes Radio Observatory, Australia; * Siding Spring Observatory, Australia; * Mount John Observatory, New Zealand Many thanks to Dermot Tutty for composing the original score for this video! Alex Cherney w: terrastro.com e: alex@terrastro.com

The Gemini Planet Imager



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The Herschel Space Observatory




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RISE OF THE SUPER TELESCOPES:

THE GIANT MAGELLAN TELESCOPE (GMT)

The Giant Magellan Telescope Organization Breaks Ground in Chile

Published on Nov 11, 2015 Concept video of the Giant Magellan Telescope MORE INFORMATION: Category News & Politics License Standard YouTube License

The scientific aims of the GMT

Star, planet, and disk formation Extrasolar planetary systems Stellar populations and chemical evolution Galaxy assembly and evolution Fundamental physics First light and reionization

The Giant Magellan Telescope is under construction in Chile and should see first light sometime in the early 2020s. Image: Giant Magellan Telescope – GMTO Corporation Website

The heart of the Giant Magellan Telescope is the segmented primary mirror. Image: Image: Giant Magellan Telescope – GMTO Corporation Website

GIANT MAGELLAN TELESCOPE - "A PERFECT MIRROR"

Published on Jul 31, 2013 Dr. Wendy Freedman, Chairman GMT, and Dr. Pat McCarthy, Director GMT, discuss the Giant Magellan Telescope's mirrors and the science that they will enable. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License GMTO Corporation Website

COSMIC MYSTERIES"

Published on Jul 31, 2013 Dr. Robert Kirshner explains the conundrum of modern science--that much of what we "know" about the universe is probably wrong and explains how the Giant Magellan Telescope addresses these fundamental mysteries. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License GMTO Corporation Website


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RISE OF THE SUPER TELESCOPES:

THE 100 Meter OWL TELESCOPE

The 100 meter OWL telescope would have operated in the open air, and then been stored in its enclosure when not in use. Image: ESO Telescope Systems Division HOME PAGE

This image simulates the increased resolving power of the OWL compared to its contemporaries. Image: ESO Telescope Systems Division HOME PAGE

Everything about OWL’s design was modular, in an effort to keep costs down. Image: ESO Telescope Systems Division HOME PAGE

Adaptive Optics Discoveries


Published on Jun 14, 2016 How adaptive optics works. Dr. Acton from Ball Aerospace tells us about discoveries made at the Keck Observatory immediately after the adaptive optics system was installed. The system uses a fast tilt and pan mirror and deformable mirror which adjust to wavelengths of distortion calculated by a wave-front control system and computer. Dr. Acton found a volcano on Io and binary brown dwarfs after building the system. Part of the Universe of Instrumentation program. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License HOME PAGE

This graphic shows the sizes of the world’s telescopes superimposed over the OWL. By Cmglee – Own workiThe source code of this SVG is valid., CC BY-SA 3.0, WKIPEDA SOURCE



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RISE OF THE SUPER TELESCOPES:

THE EUROPEAN EXTREMELY LARGE TELESCOPE

This artist’s rendering of the E-ELT is based on the detailed construction design for the telescope. Image: ESO/L. Calçada/ACe Consortium

This artist’s rendering of the E-ELT is based on the detailed construction design for the telescope. Image: ESO/L. Calçada/ACe Consortium

This diagram shows the novel 5-mirror optical system of ESO’s Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). Before reaching the science instruments the light is first reflected from the telescope’s giant concave 39-metre segmented primary mirror (M1), it then bounces off two further 4-metre-class mirrors, one convex (M2) and one concave (M3). The final two mirrors (M4 and M5) form a built-in adaptive optics system to allow extremely sharp images to be formed at the final focal plane. Image By ESO – CC BY 4.0,

ESOcast 84: The New E-ELT Design Unveiled

Published on Jun 3, 2016 ESO has awarded the biggest contract in ground-based astronomy — to build the E-ELT dome and telescope structure. So it’s a good time to take a look at what the E-ELT will be. This video is available for download in various formats at: Credit: ESO. Editing: Herbert Zodet. Web and technical support: Mathias André and Raquel Yumi Shida. Written by: Peter Grimley and Richard Hook. Narration: Sara Mendes da Costa. Music: Toomas Erm and Johan B. Monell (www.johanmonell.com). Footage and photos: ESO, L. Calçada, M. Kornmesser, ACe Consortium, M. Struik (CERN), ICAFAL/BROTEC Construcción, Microgate/ADS, G. Hüdepohl (atacamaphoto.com), AdOptica,NOVA/METIS/MAORY/MICADO consortium, HARMONI consortium, ESA/Hubble, Theofanis N. Matsopoulos and C. Malin (christophmalin.com). Directed by: Herbert Zodet. Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen. Category Science & Technology License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Source videos View attributions

This artist’s impression shows the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) in its enclosure. The E-ELT will be a 39-metre aperture optical and infrared telescope sited on Cerro Armazones in the Chilean Atacama Desert, 20 kilometres from ESO’s Very Large Telescope on Cerro Paranal, which is visible in the distance towards the left. The design for the E-ELT shown here is preliminary. ESO/L. Calçada



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RISE OF THE SUPER TELESCOPES:

The Large Symnoptic Survey Telescope (Future)


lsst.afw: making of a library


Lsst main page and LSST DATA MANAGEMENT

An artist's illustration of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope with a simulated night sky. Image: Todd Mason, Mason Productions Inc. / LSST Corporation

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Camera


Published on Nov 1, 2016 Ranked as the top ground-based national priority for the field for the current decade, LSST is currently under construction in Chile. The U.S. Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is leading the construction of the LSST camera – the largest digital camera ever built for astronomy. SLAC Professor Steven M. Kahn is the overall Director of the LSST project, and SLAC personnel are also participating in the data management. The National Science Foundation is the lead agency for construction of the LSST. Additional financial support comes from the Department of Energy and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation. To learn more, visit Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

The primary-tertiay mirror at its construction facility. Image: LSST

Handling all of the data from the LSST requires its own infrastructure. Image: LSST

Published on Mar 19, 2015 Visualizing 8.5 years of development of lsst.afw, from the git log. The visualization runs at 4 days/second. Lines represent directories and leaves represent files, color-coded by extension. Only files touched in the past 4 months are shown on the screen at any point in time. Built using gource + ffmpeg, with audio added in iMovie. See for more.

For more on LSST, see The LSST WEB SITE

and The DM.Lsst.org

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is all about time. Watching the sky over and over,
night after night, watching for anything that changes.


Credit: Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (CC-SA 4.0)


Artist’s impression of a gamma-ray burst. Credit: ESO/A. Roquette


Artist rendering of the LSST observatory (foreground) atop Cerro Pachón in Chile.
Credit: Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Project Office.


Suzanne Jacoby with the LSST focal plane array scale model. The image of the moon (30 arcminutes)
is placed there for scale of the Field of View.
Credit: Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (CC-SA 4.0)



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RISE OF THE SUPER TELESCOPES:

The Thirty Meter Telescope (Future)


An artist's illustration of the Thirty Meter Telescope at its preferred location at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Image Courtesy TMT International Observatory


An illustration of the segmented primary mirror of the Thirty Meter Telescope. Image Courtesy TMT International Observatory


The Thirty Meter Telescope (Future)


Published on Sep 30, 2014 Observatory Sciences is working on the Thirty Meter Telescope, a new US giant optical telescope, which is planned to be constructed on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Category People & Blogs License Standard YouTube License Images Courtesy TMT International Observatory


The top of Mauna Kea is a prime site for telescopes, as shown in this image. Image Courtesy Mauna Kea Observatories


Published on Mar 16, 2016 Thirty Meter Telescope is a golden opportunity to participate in a world class research for Indian Scientist. They will face the most cutting edge intellectual problems of our time. The experience and technology will help India usher in a new era of Astronomy. With a Thirty Meter diameter mirror, cutting-edge adaptive optics, TMT will be the most powerful telescope humankind has ever built Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License




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RISE OF THE SUPER TELESCOPES:

The James Webb Space Telescope


A full-scale model of the JWST went on a bit of a World Tour. Here it is in Munich, Germany. Image Credit: EADS Astrium

The JWST will do its observing while in what’s called a halo orbit at L2, a sort of gravitationally neutral point 1.5 million km from Earth. Image: NASA/JWST

The business end of the James Webb Space Telescope is its 18-segment primary mirror. The gleaming, gold-coated beryllium mirror has a collecting area of 25 square meters. Image: NASA/Chris Gunn

This image shows the wavelengths of the infrared spectrum that Webb’s instruments can observe. Image: NASA/JWST

Galaxy Evolution: James Webb Space Telescope Science


Uploaded on Oct 19, 2010 Watch how the James Webb Space Telescope's ability to look farther into space than ever before will bring newborn galaxies into view. These videos were developed to highlight the science that will be peformed by the James Webb Space Telescope. You can download this video: Credit: NASA/GSFC Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Source videos View attributions

Planetary Formation: James Webb Space Telescope Science


Uploaded on Oct 19, 2010 Watch how the James Webb Space Telescope's ability to look farther into space than ever before will bring newborn galaxies into view. These videos were developed to highlight the science that will be peformed by the James Webb Space Telescope. You can download this video: Credit: NASA/GSFC Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Source videos View attributions

Planetary Formation: James Webb Space Telescope Science


Uploaded on Oct 19, 2010 Stars and planets form in the dark, inside vast, cold clouds of gas and dust. The James Webb Space Telescope's large mirror and infrared sensitivity will let astronomers peer inside dusty knots where the youngest stars and planets are forming. These videos were developed to highlight the science that will be peformed by the James Webb Space Telescope. You can download this video: Credit: NASA/GSFC Category Science & Technology License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Source videos View attributions

James Webb Space Telescope Deployment In Detail


Published on Apr 8, 2014 This video shows in-depth what will happen when James Webb Space Telescope deploys after launch. : For more information, see this description on our website Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


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RADIO Observatories!

China completes world's largest alien-hunting telescope


Published on Jul 4, 2016 ET, phone Beijing. The final triangular panel in the world’s largest radio telescope was lowered into place this weekend
as Chinese officials amped up the hunt for alien life. If intelligent beings lurk in the universe, the spectacular new Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST)
is uniquely equipped to find them, promised Peng Bo, director of the National Astronomical Observation (NAO).
License Standard YouTube License
The search for alien life will soon get a major boost as the Chinese government has finished construction of their enormous ET-hunting radio telescope.
At a cost of $180 million dollars, the massive telescope measures an astounding 1,640 feet in diameter, making it the largest such device in the world. With the construction stage finished, Chinese scientists will begin testing the telescope to ensure that it is running properly and hope to begin operation of the device in earnest this September. By virtue of its incredible size, the telescope will be able to detect extremely faint radio signals that otherwise would be missed by current technology here on Earth. While many Chinese citizens were celebrating the completion of the project, it is surely bittersweet for the 9,000 people who once resided in the area but were forced to relocate by the government. And although the powerful telescope boasts tremendous potential to possibly find evidence of aliens, one wonders if the Chinese government
would actually reveal any discoveries should they 'hear' from ET. Source: Daily Mail

CHINA TO RELOCATE THOUSANDS FOR WORLD’S LARGEST RADIO TELESCOPE


China's new radio telescope, the world's largest, should be completed by September 2016. Image: FAST

World’s Largest Radio Telescope Nears Completion, And It’s Going To Find ALIENS Ross McG May 3, 2016


The combo picture show the construction process of the FAST. (Xinhua photo)


The world’s largest radio telescope is almost finished - and it’s going to try to make contact with extra-terrestrial life.
This fascinating video and stunning photos show how close the 500m wide Aperture Spherical Telescope, or “FAST”, is to completion.

A selection of Photos showing near completion of this telescope
Pictures credit : CEN


Photo taken on June 27, 2016 shows the FAST at sunset. (Xinhua photo/Liu Xu)


The photo taken on July 3, 2016 shows the FAST. (Xinhua photo/Ou Dongqu)


Photo taken on June 27, 2016 shows the FAST at night. (Xinhua photo/Liu Xu))


China begins operating world's largest radio telescope

In this Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016 photo released by Xinhua News Agency, an aerial view shows the
Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) in the remote Pingtang county in southwest China’s Guizhou province.
China has begun operating the world’s largest radio telescope to help search for extraterrestrial life.
(Liu Xu/Xinhua via AP) (Associated Press)

Capturing the Radio Sky

Uploaded on May 11, 2015 These side-by-side videos show the sky as seen looking straight up from the ground at radio (left) and optical (right) wavelengths.
The radio movie covers 24 hours of observation with the new Owens Valley Long Wavelength Array, a project led by Caltech.
Each frame is a 9-second integration with the telescope, but only every tenth image is included. The optical movie was made using an all-sky camera
at Palomar Observatory and therefore only covers nighttime. Note that the radio sky is completely distinct to that visible at optical wavelengths. Almost all of the sources visible in the optical movie
are stars. The density of stars is highest in the Milky Way, which is visible to the naked eye.
Radio emission from our galaxy is also clearly visible in the LWA movie, but is produced not by stars but by cosmic rays spiraling in the magnetic
fields of our galaxy. The brightest source in the radio is not the sun—both Cassiopeia A and Cygnus A are brighter. However, when the Sun flares (as it does in the LWA movie),
it can become thousands of times brighter than anything else in the sky. Credit: Stephen Bourke/Caltech and the LWA team Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

The Breakthrough Initiative

In Green Bank, Breakthrough Listen has access to the largest fully steerable radio telescope on the planet.

Image: The Green Bank Radio Telescope (GBT) focuses 2.3 acres of radio light. It is 148 meters tall,
nearly as tall as the nearby mountains and much taller than pine trees in the national forest.
The telescope is in a valley of the Allegheny mountains to shield the observations from radio interference.
Credit: NRAO/AUI.

Berkeley SETI Live Chat from Green Bank about Tabby's Star observations has access to the largest fully steerable radio telescope on the planet.

TABETHA BOYJIAN

Streamed live on Oct 26, 2016 BSRC Director Dr. Andrew Siemion is joined by Louisiana State Professor Tabetha Boyajian and Penn State Professor Jason Wright
for a live chat from the Green Bank observatory about their observations of Tabby's Star. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


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The ALMA Milli-Meter Radio Observatory

ALMA CAPTURES NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN DETAILS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISK

ALMA’s best image of a protoplanetary disk to date. This picture of the nearby young star TW Hydrae
reveals the classic rings and gaps that signify planets are in formation in this system.
Credit: S. Andrews (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA); B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

This photo of the ALMA antennas on the Chajnantor Plateau in Chile, more than 16,000 feet (5000 meters) above sea level,
was taken a few days before the start of ALMA Early Science and shows only one cluster of the 66 dishes.
ALMA views the sky in submillimeter light, a slice of the spectrum invisible to the human eye that lies between
infrared and radio waves. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/W. Garnier (ALMA)

Soar Over ALMA with NRAO's New Drone Footage from NRAO Outreach on Vimeo.

The NRAO Digital Learning Team recently visited our Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in northern Chile to update our suite of virtual tours called The ALMA Explorer (https://public.nrao.edu/explorer/alma). Here is a small sample of drone footage recently captured at the array -- yes, we successfully flew a drone at 16,500 ft above sea level in high wind and freezing cold!

ALMA image of the planet-forming disk around the young, sun-like star TW Hydrae.
The inset image (upper right) zooms in on the gap nearest to the star,
which is at the same distance as the Earth is from the sun, and may show an infant version
of our home planet emerging from the dust and gas. The additional concentric light and dark features
represent other planet-forming regions farther out in the disk.
Credit: S. Andrews (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA), ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

The model (at left) of a protoplanetary disk shows a newly forming star at the center of a saucer-shaped dust cloud.
At right, a close up of TW Hydrae taken by ALMA shows a gap about 93 million miles from the central star,
suggesting that a planet with a similar orbit to Earth is forming there. Credit: (Left: L. Calcada).
Right: S. Andrews (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA); B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

This image compares the size of the solar system with HL Tauri and its surrounding protoplanetary disc.
Although the star is much smaller than the Sun, the disc around HL Tauri stretches out to almost three times
as far from the star as Neptune is from the Sun. Credit:ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)


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The Spitzer Infrared telescope


The Spitzer Telescope on the Launch Pad

Twelve Years of Spitzer Images This montage displays an image released from each year of operation of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
Now celebrating it's 12th anniversary, Spitzer was first launched into space on August 25, 2003, from Cape Canaveral, Florida
and is still going strong. Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech


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The Neutrino Antartic telescope


The IceCube detector is a cubic kilometre of Antarctic ice threaded with sensitive light detectors. Billions of cosmic neutrinos stream through us at the speed of light every second. Fortunately they have virtually no mass or charge, and generally don't interact with normal matter or we'd all look like Swiss cheese. And while we've known about them for 100 years, where these high energy particles come from and what's causing them to bolt across the universe has remained a mystery - until now.

Green Bank Observatory Inaugurated

Green Bank Observatory Today(October 8, 2016) astronomers celebrate the inauguration of the Green Bank Observatory in West Virginia,
home to the 100-meter Green Bank Telescope, one of the world's most powerful astronomical instruments.
Formerly a cornerstone of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), the Green Bank Observatory
is now a fully-fledged, independent astronomical and educational facility of the National Science Foundation (NSF),
operated under a cooperative agreement with Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI).


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The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA)

THE CLOSEST SUPERNOVA SINCE 1604 IS HISSING AT US

Artist’s impression of the supernova flare seen in the Large Magellanic Cloud on February 23rd, 1987.
Credit: CAASTRO / Mats Björklund (Magipics).

Artist’s impression of the star in its multi-million year long and previously unobservable phase as a large, red supergiant.
Credit: CAASTRO / Mats Björklund (Magipics)

Aerial photograph of the core region of the MWA telescope. Credit: mwatelescope.org

THE Web site of the Murchison Widefield array


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Gamma Ray Observatories!

A NEW PROTOTYPE TELESCOPE PROVES ITSELF WORTHY

The Cherenkov Telescope Array prototype, located at the Serra La Nave observing stationon Mount Etna, Sicily.
Credit: CTA Observatory

A IACT telescope at the Whipple Observatory, Mount Hopkins, Arizona.
Credit:

Polaris, the North Star, as observed by ASTRI with different offsets from the optical axis of the telescope.
Credits: Enrico Giro/Rodolfo Canestrari/Salvo Scuderi/Giorgia Sironi/INAF

Artist’s impression of a gamma-ray burst. Credit: ESO/A. Roquette


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