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William Bacon's The James Webb Telescope Page Index


INTRODUCTION

Current status of the deep space network

Thank You Northrup Gruman!!!!


The control center of the Webb telescope


Introduction To The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE

A full scale Mockup of the James Webb Telescope at the South by South West convention in Austin Texas.

Illustration of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope(Final Deployment). Credits: NASA

The Webb Telescope Website!!!!!


NASA's James Web Telescope Mission Page


The Webb Telescope: Mission Brief

Webb Telescope Deployment Sequence

Published on Jun 30, 2016 NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope,
the most powerful infrared science observatory ever to be sent into space.
From its orbit nearly a million miles from Earth, Webb will study some of the most distant objects in the universe
-- but first it has to get there. Webb will be folded up inside the rocket that launches it into space,
gradually unfurling as it travels to its destination beyond the Moon. This video depicts Webb's journey into orbit,
capturing both its travel time and distance and its transformation as it deploys. CREDITS: Produced by NASA and Northrop Grumman Narration: Lee Arenberg Writer and Director: Jonathan Arenberg Script Consultants: Jon Lawrence, Carl Starr, Marc Kirkpatrick, Joel Green, Andy Salvatore, Connie Reese, and Bill Morelli Technical Consultants: Brandyn Bok, Jonathan Lowe, Michale Mesarch, and Karen Richon Animation: Faren Mandel, Vladimir Sierra, Tony Carrillo, and Juan Bautista Voice Direction and Recording: Dan Koblosh Editing and Music direction: Bob Jaques Astronomical Images: Special Thanks: Arianespace Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

James Webb Space Telescope Deployment In Detail

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Published on Apr 8, 2014 This video shows in-depth what will happen when James Webb Space Telescope deploys after launch. For more information, see this description on our website: http://jwst.nasa.gov/faq.html#howdeploy Download video: http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (67 MB .wmv) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (169 MB .wmv) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (271 MB .wmv) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (92 MB .mp4) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (172 MB .mp4) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (118.9 MB iPad .mp4) http://jwst.nasa.gov/videos/JWST_2014... (132 MB Nexus 7 .mp4) Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


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The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE Under Construction

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NASA Engineers Conduct Low Light Test on New Technology for Webb Telescope

NASA engineers inspect a new piece of technology developed for the James Webb Space Telescope,
the micro shutter array, with a low light test at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
Developed at Goddard to allow Webb's Near Infrared Spectrograph to obtain spectra of more than 100 objects in the
universe simultaneously, the micro shutter array uses thousands of tiny shutters to capture spectra from selected objects
of interest in space and block out light from all other sources.

The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE Launch Vehicle

The Ariane5 lifting off from Kourou in French Guiana. Image: ESA/Arianespace.

Flight VA228: The successful launch of Intelsat 29e, and Ariane 5’s 70th success in a row

Published on Jan 27, 2016 Arianespace has successfully launched Intelsat 29e for the international operator Intel-sat.
Arianespace’s first launch of the year, and its 56th performed for Intelsat, took place on
January 27 at 8:20 pm (local time) from the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana.
This 70th success in a row for Ariane 5 initiates another ambitious year for Arianespace,
which is planning to launch up to eight Ariane 5 missions during 2016. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

More livable than Earth? New index sizes up the habitability of alien exoplanets
by ALAN BOYLE on OCTOBER 5, 2015

NASA’s James Webb Telescope, shown in this artist’s conception,
will provide more information about previously detected exoplanets. A new habitability index
is aimed at helping the Webb team prioritize its search.
Credit: NASA

Click Here for the James Webb Observatory

The JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE

JWST is Coming to a Lagrangian Point Near You!

James Webb Space Telescope Trailer

NASA Webb Telescope Structure is Sound After Vibration Testing Detects Anomaly

The 18-segment gold coated primary mirror of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is raised into vertical alignment in the largest clean room at the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, on Nov. 2, 2016. The secondary mirror mount booms are folded down into stowed for launch configuration. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Technicians work on the James Webb Space Telescope in the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, on Nov. 2, 2016, as the completed golden primary mirror and observatory structure stands gloriously vertical on a work stand, reflecting incoming light from the area and observation deck. Credit: Ken Kremer/

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope placed inside a “clean tent” in Nov. 2016 to protect it from dust and dirt as engineers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland transport it out of the relatively dust-free cleanroom and into a shirtsleeve environment to conduct vibration and acoustics tests to confirm it is fit for launch in 2018. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn

All 18 gold coated primary mirrors of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope are seen fully unveiled after removal of protective covers installed onto the backplane structure, as technicians work inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. The secondary mirror mount booms are folded down into stowed for launch configuration . Credit: Ken Kremer/

Up close side-view of newly exposed gold coated primary mirrors installed onto mirror backplane holding structure of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. Aft optics subsystem stands upright at center of 18 mirror segments between stowed secondary mirror mount booms. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Ken Kremer/Universe Today reflecting in and about the golden mirrors of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope which will peer back 13.5 Billion years to unravel the mysteries off the formation of the early Universe and tell us how our place in the Universe came to be. Credit: Ken Kremer/

NASA Webb Telescope Resumes Rigorous Vibration Qualification Tests

NASA engineers and technicians position the James Webb Space Telescope (inside a large tent) onto the shaker table used for vibration testing. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn



The JWST’s Optical Telescope element/Integrated Science instrument module (OTIS) undergoing testing at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Credit: NASA/Desiree Stover

The James Webb Space Telescope’s 18-segment primary mirror, a gold-coated beryllium mirror has a collecting area of 25 square meters. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn

Once deployed, the JWST will conduct a variety of science missions aimed at improving our understanding of the Universe. Credit: NASA/STScI

Artist’s impression of the planet orbiting a red dwarf star. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

Who's excited for the James Webb Space Telescope?More info: bit.ly/1Xzc2ex

Posted by I fucking love science on Saturday, November 28, 2015

JAMES WEBB WRAPS UP 3 MONTHS IN THE FREEZER. IT’S READY FOR SPACE

The James Webb Space Telescope inside a clean room at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Credit: NASA/JSC

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope sits in Chamber A at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston awaiting the colossal door to close in July 2017 for cryogenic testing. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

he sunshield test unit on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is unfurled for the first time. Credit: NASA

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is a civilization scale mission, set to look back to the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang and help answer the question “are we alone in the universe?” After passing a key test at Johnson Space Center designed to simulate the cold vacuum of space, Webb is ready for the next step ahead of a launch in 2019. This video is available for download from NASA's Image and Video Library:

Into the Unknown

Published on Dec 12, 2016 Into the Unknown tells the story of the building of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope – a revolutionary observatory, 100 times more powerful and the scientific successor to the Hubble Telescope. Launching in late 2018, Webb will reveal a universe we have never seen before and is poised to answer questions that have intrigued us for thousands of years: How did the universe begin? Where did we come from? Are we alone? Armed with dynamic scenes of construction, fascinating conversations with scientists and engineers and stunning visuals, Into the Unknown offers an in-depth look at one of the most daring scientific missions ever attempted. A story for all ages, this film captures the wonder of the cosmos and the timeless human desire to understand our place within the universe. The Northrop Grumman Foundation, in partnership with filmmaker Nathaniel Kahn, developed this documentary as a resource for teachers, students and space enthusiasts around the world to enjoy. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

NASA Webb Telescope Construction Leaps Forward with Delivery
of Mirror Holding Backbone Flight Structure
by KEN KREMER on OCTOBER 8, 2015

View showing actual flight structure of mirror backplane unit for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
that holds 18 segment primary mirror array and secondary mirror mount at front, in stowed-for-launch configuration.
JWST is being assembled here by technicians inside the world’s largest cleanroom at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Up close view of actual side wing backplane of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
that will hold 3 of the observatory’s 18 primary mirrors, as technicians work inside cleanroom
at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Side view of flight unit mirror backplane assembly structure for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
that holds primary mirror array and secondary mirror mount in stowed-for-launch configuration.
JWST is being assembled technicians inside the cleanroom at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Credit: Ken Kremer.com

First Mirror Installed on NASA’s Webb Telescope, Final Assembly Phase Starts by Ken Kremer on November 25, 2015

The James Webb Space Telescope team successfully installed the first flight mirror onto the telescope structure
at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn Story/photos updated

Inside a massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
the James Webb Space Telescope Team prepared for the first flight mirror’s installation onto the telescope structure.
Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

An engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center worked to install the first flight mirror onto the telescope structure at
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Credits:
NASA/Chris Gunn

AEngineers practiced mirror installation techniques and processing using a spare primary mirror on JWST’s “Pathfinder”
backplane and secondary mirror tripod assembly in 2014 inside the clean room at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Secondary mirror at top. Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Close-up view of spare primary mirrors installed on JWST’s “Pathfinder” backplane structure
during practice session in 2014 inside the clean room at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Gold coated flight spare of a JWST primary mirror segment made of beryllium
and used for test operations inside the NASA Goddard clean room. Credit: Ken Kremer.com

Time-lapse: The Assembly of the James Webb Space Telescope Primary Mirror

Published on Feb 11, 2016 This time-lapse shows the assembly of the primary mirror of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. Assembly was completed on February 3, 2016.
JWST is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built.
Webb will study many phases in the history of our universe, including the formation of solar systems capable of supporting
life on planets similar to Earth, as well as the evolution of our own solar system. It’s targeted to launch from French Guiana aboard
an Ariane 5 rocket in 2018. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, ESA (European Space Agency) and the
Canadian Space Agency. Download video: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/det... Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE TAKES THE GLOVES OFF

Behold, the mighty primary mirror of the James Webb Space Telescope, in all its gleaming glory!
Image: NASA/Chris Gunn

The James Webb Space Telescope in the clean room at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Image: NASA/Chris Gunn NASA groups JWST’s science objectives into four areas:
  • infrared vision that acts like a time-machine, giving us a look at the first stars and galaxies to form in the Universe,
    over 13 billion years ago.
  • a comparative study of the stately spiral and elliptical galaxies of our age with the faintest, earliest galaxies to form in the Universe.
  • a probing gaze through clouds of dust, to watch stars and planets being born.
  • a look at extrasolar planets, and their atmospheres, keeping an eye out for biomarkers.

WEBB TELESCOPE GETS ITS SCIENCE INSTRUMENTS INSTALLED

In this rare view, the James Webb Space Telescope team crane lifted the science instrument package
for installation into the telescope structure. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

In this rare view, the James Webb Space Telescope team crane lifted the science instrument package
for installation into the telescope structure. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

This side shot shows a glimpse inside a massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in
Greenbelt, Maryland where the James Webb Space Telescope team worked meticulously to complete the science instrument package installation.
Credits: NASA/Desiree Stover

Up close view shows cone shaped Aft Optics Subsystem (AOS) standing at center of Webb telescopes 18 segment primary mirror
at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. ISIM science instrument module will be installed
inside truss structure below. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Up close side-view of newly exposed gold coated primary mirrors installed onto mirror backplane holding structure of
NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
on May 3, 2016. Aft optics subsystem stands upright at center of 18 mirror segments between stowed secondary mirror mount booms.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

All 18 gold coated primary mirrors of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope are seen fully unveiled after removal of protective covers
installed onto the backplane structure, as technicians work inside the massive clean room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 3, 2016. The secondary mirror mount booms are folded down into stowed for launch configuration. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Time-Lapse Tilting of Webb Telescope's Primary Mirror

Published on May 4, 2016 The 18-segment primary mirror of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope was raised into vertical alignment
in the largest clean room at the agency's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, on May 4, 2016. The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb will study many phases in the history of our universe,
including the formation of solar systems capable of supporting life on planets similar to Earth, as well as the evolution of our own solar system.
It’s targeted to launch from French Guiana aboard an Ariane 5 rocket in 2018. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners,
ESA (European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency. Learn more at: Goddard Space Flight Center Nasa's webb telescope page Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Francis Reddy, Syneren Technologies Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: Or find us on Twitter: Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


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WHEN JAMES WEBB FINALLY REACHES SPACE, HERE’S WHAT IT’LL BE HUNTING


Artist’s concept of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with Sunshield at bottom Credit: Ken Kremer.com

The James Webb Space Telescope web site

The Hubble Space Telescope on the left has a 2.4 meter mirror and the James Webb Space Telescope has a 6.5 meter mirror. LUVOIR, not shown, will dwarf them both with a massive 15 meter mirror. Credit: NASA



ScienceCasts: Readying the Webb Telescope for Launch

Published on Apr 17, 2017 Visit for more. Stringent testing is underway to prove the James Webb Space Telescope can handle an Earth-shaking take-off and still capture the universe’s first light while deeply ensconced in the hyper-cold of space.

What Will the James Webb Space Telescope See? A Whole Bunch of Dust, That’s What

When it comes to the first galaxies, the James Webb Space Telescope will attempt to understand the formation of those galaxies and their link to the underlying dark matter. In case you didn’t know, most of the matter in our universe is invisible (a.k.a. “dark”), but its gravity binds everything together, including galaxies. So by studying galaxies – and especially their formation – we can get some hints as to how dark matter works. At least, that’s the hope. It turns out that astronomy is a little bit more complicated than that, and one of the major things we have to deal with when studying these distant galaxies is dust. A lot of dust.

The First Stars in the Universe - Ask a Spaceman!

Were the dark ages really dark? What is a perturbation, and how did they grow in the early universe? When the first stars awoke, what happened? I discuss these questions and more in today’s Ask a Spaceman! Full podcast episodes: Support the show: Follow: Follow: on twitter Follow:on Facebook Watch on YouTube: Go on an adventure: Keep those questions about space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, physics, and cosmology coming to #AskASpaceman for COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE! Big thanks to my top Patreon supporters this month: Robert R., Justin G., Matthew K., Kevin O., Chris C., Helge B., Tim R., Steve P., Lars H., Khaled T., Chris L., John F., Craig B., Mark R., David B., Stephen M., Andrew P., and George L.! Music by Jason Grady and Nick Bain. Thanks to WCBE Radio for hosting the recording session, Greg Mobius for producing, and Cathy Rinella for editing. Hosted by Paul M. Sutter, astrophysicist at The Ohio State University, Chief Scientist at COSI Science Center, and the one and only Agent to the Stars

Q&A 50: Can James Webb Find Megastructures? And More... Featuring Abby Harrison

In this week's questions show, I wonder if the James Webb Space Telescope will be able to find satellites around other stars, what my favorite sci-fi FTL method is, and why can't we see Mars as a bright object in the sky? Check out Abby's channel here: Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: Follow us on Tumblr: More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001 Music: Left Spine Down - “X-Ray”

Illustration of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. Credits: NASA

A composite image from IllustrisTNG. Panels on the left show galaxy-galaxy interactions and the fine-grained structure of extended stellar halos. Panels on the right show stellar light projections from two massive central galaxies at the present day. It’s easy to see how the light from massive central galaxies overwhelms the light from stellar halos. Image: IllustrisTNG

The Illustris web site


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Phew! James Webb passes its final thermal vacuum test.
Still on track for 2021

Once it is deployed to space, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be the most sophisticated and advanced space telescope in operation. Carrying on in the tradition of Hubble, Kepler, and Spitzer, the JWST will use its advanced suite of infrared imaging capabilities to study distant exoplanets, learn more about the Solar System, and study the earliest galaxies in the Universe.

The James Webb’s spacecraft element being placed into Northrop Grumman’s environmental testing chambers. Credits: Northrop Grumman

Testing Webb. Credit: NASA/Desiree Stover

First assembly August 2019

Image: The fully assembled James Webb Space Telescope with its sunshield and unitized pallet structures (UPSs) that fold up around the telescope for launch, are seen partially deployed to an open configuration to enable telescope installation. Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn. “This is an exciting time to now see all Webb’s parts finally joined together into a single observatory for the very first time,” says Gregory Robinson, the Webb program director at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. “The engineering team has accomplished a huge step forward and soon we will be able to see incredible new views of our amazing universe.”

Image: Integration teams carefully guide Webb’s suspended telescope section into place above its Spacecraft Element just prior to integration. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn. The sunshield should allow the telescope, once at the L2 Lagrangian point, to cool down below 50 Kelvin (-223 degrees Celsius) by simply radiating its heat into space. This will allow successful functioning of the near-infrared instruments, which include the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam), the Near InfraRed Spectrograph (NIRSpec) and the Fine Guidance Sensor / Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (FGS/NIRISS) — all of these work at 39 K (-234°C). The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) will operate at 7 K (-266 degrees Celsius) using a cryocooler system. Thermal stability will allow proper alignment of the primary mirror segments.

Image: NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, post-integration, inside Northrop Grumman’s cleanroom facilities in Redondo Beach, California. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn. With launch scheduled for 2021, extensive environmental and deployment testing will now be undertaken for the fully assembled observatory. All of the telescope’s major components have gone through rounds of environmental tests including launch stress and vibration, but we now have to put the integrated assembly through its paces. As if launch wasn’t stressful enough, we’ll have to sweat out deployment of the sunshield and the 6.5-meter primary mirror, all destined for Earth-Sun L2, which is far beyond the orbit of the Moon. Plenty of suspense ahead as we tune-up for 2021. Getting this expensive bird in place is going to be a nail-biter.


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