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William Bacon's Tess mission Page Index


Introduction

Nasa's Tess page thank you usa Taxpayer and
the Federal Reserve creating money out of thin air


Status of the Deep Space Network


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The Launch!


FAREWELL KEPLER. WELCOME TESS


Liftoff of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NASA’s TESS spacecraft. 
Image credit: NASA TV


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The Mission


NASA | The Search for New Worlds is Here


The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is an astrophysics Explorer-class mission between NASA and MIT.
 After launching in 2017, TESS will use four cameras to scan the entire sky, searching for planets 
 outside our Solar System, known as exoplanets. The mission will monitor over 500,000 of the brightest stars 
 in the sky, searching for dips in their brightness that would indicate a planet transiting across. 
 TESS is predicted to find over 3,000 exoplanet candidates, ranging from gas giants to small rocky planets.
 About 500 of these planets are expected to be similar to Earth's size.
 The stars TESS monitors will be 30-100 times brighter than those observed by Kepler,
 making follow-up observations much easier. Using TESS data, missions like the James Webb Space Telescope 
 can determine specific characteristics of these planets, including whether they could support life.

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Voice-over by Peter Cullen, the voice of Optimus Prime of the Transformers

How NASA’s Newest Planet Hunter Scans the Sky

TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is NASA's newest exoplanet mission. Led by MIT, TESS will find thousands of new planets orbiting nearby stars. During its two year survey, TESS will watch a wide variety of stars, looking for signs of planets ranging from Earth-size to larger than Jupiter. Each of TESS's cameras has a 16.8-megapixel sensor covering a square 24 degrees wide — large enough to contain an entire constellation. TESS has four of these cameras arranged to view a long strip of the sky called an observation sector. TESS will watch each observation sector for about 27 days before rotating to the next. It will cover the southern sky in its first year, and then begin scanning the north. TESS will study 85 percent of the sky — an area 350 times greater than what NASA's Kepler mission first observed — making TESS the first exoplanet mission to survey nearly the entire sky. Because TESS's observation sectors overlap, it will have an area near the pole under constant observation. This region is easily monitored by the James Webb Space Telescope, which allows the two missions to work together to first find, and then carefully study exoplanets. Music: "Drive to Succeed" from Killer Tracks

Credits: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio at: If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/NASAExplorer Follow NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center · Facebook: · Twitter · Twitter · Flickr · Instagram · Google+ Category Science & Technology

NASA’s TESS Catches a Comet

This video is compiled from a series of images taken on July 25 by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. The angular extent of the widest field of view is six degrees. Visible in the images are the comet C/2018 N1, asteroids, variable stars, asteroids and reflected light from Mars. TESS is expected to find thousands of planets around other nearby stars.

In a series of papers, Professor Loeb and Michael Hippke indicate that conventional rockets would have a hard time escaping from certain kinds of extra-solar planets. Credit: NASA/Tim Pyle

Artist’s concept of the Kepler mission with Earth in the background. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

How the K2 mission rescued Kepler. Image credit: NASA

The number of confirmed exoplanets, by year. Credit: NASA

#42 ON TRENDING The TESS Mission


SpaceX is targeting launch of NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) on Wednesday, April 18 from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The 30-second launch window opens at 6:51 p.m. EDT, or 22:51 UTC. TESS will be deployed into a highly elliptical orbit approximately 48 minutes after launch. Following stage separation, SpaceX will attempt to land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean.

Artist Illustration of TESS and its 4 telescopes. Credit: NASA/MIT

Illustration of the TESS field of view. Credit: NASA/MIT

Simulation of the TESS orbit. Credit: NASA/MIT

TESS Telescope Discovered Its First Exoplanet - Pi Mensae c

You can buy Universe Sandbox 2 game here: Hello and welcome to What Da Math! In this video, we will talk about new discovery from TESS telescope that you can read about here: Support this channel on Patreon to help me make this a full time job: Space Engine is available for free here: Enjoy and please subscribe. Twitter: X Twitter: Twitch


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Now that TESS is Operational, Astronomers Estimate it’ll Find 14,000 Planets.
10 Could Be Earthlike Worlds in a Sunlike Star’s Habitable Zone

How many exoplanets are there? Not that long ago, we didn’t know if there were any. Then we detected a few around pulsars. Then the Kepler spacecraft was launched and it discovered a couple thousand more. Now NASA’s TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) is operational, and a new study predicts its findings.

Kepler’s field of view encompassed only 0.25% of the sky. TESS will look at almost the entire sky. Image: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech, Image credit: Software Bisque

This is TESS’s First Light image. On the left is the star R Doradus, and on the right is the Large Magellanic Cloud. Image: By NASA/MIT/TESS

Most exoplanets orbit red dwarf stars because they’re the most plentiful stars. This is an artist’s illustration of what the TRAPPIST-1 system might look like from a vantage point near planet TRAPPIST-1f (at right). Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Image: The TESS search space compared to that of the Kepler Mission. Credit: Zach Berta-Thompson.

Image: Ana Humphrey won a $250,000 prize for calculating the potential for finding more planets outside our solar system. Credit: NASA GSFC.


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TESS Just Found its First Earth-Sized World

NASA’s new planet-hunting telescope, TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite), just found its first Earth-sized world. Though the Earth-sized planet, and its hot sub-Neptune companion, were first observed by TESS in January 2019, it’s taken until now to confirm their status with ground-based follow-up observations. The discovery is published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

The Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Image Credit: By Jan Skowron – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Wilipeda source

An artist’s illustration of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. Credits: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Artist’s illustration of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Artist’s illustration of what the TRAPPIST-1 system might look like from a vantage point near planet TRAPPIST-1f (at right). Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech


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NASA Promised More Smaller, Earth-size Exoplanets. TESS is Delivering.

This infographic illustrates key features of the TOI 270 system, located about 73 light-years away in the southern constellation Pictor. The three known planets were discovered by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite through periodic dips in starlight caused by each orbiting world. Insets show information about the planets, including their relative sizes, and how they compare to Earth. Temperatures given for TOI 270’s planets are equilibrium temperatures, calculated without the warming effects of any possible atmospheres. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Scott Wiessinger

This scattergram of Kepler first three years of exoplanets shows that Kepler mostly found planets much larger than Earth. Many of the Kepler candidate exoplanets were orbiting very active stars, with so much stellar flaring and other activity that habitability is doubtful. Image Credit: NASA Ames/W. Stenzel

Because these planets are so close to their star, it’s natural to compare them with Jupiter and its moons. Image Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

The James Webb Space Telescope inside a cleanroom at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Launch the darn thing already! Credit: NASA/JSC


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One Year, Almost 1,000 Planetary Candidates. An Update On TESS

Illustration of the GJ 357 system. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center / Chris Smith

One Year, Almost 1,000 Planetary Candidates. An Update On TESS

NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Telescope launched back in April, 2018. After a few months of testing, it was ready to begin mapping the southern sky, searching for planets orbiting stars relatively nearby. We’re just over a year into the mission now, and on July 18th, TESS has shifted its attention to the Northern Hemisphere, continuing the hunt for planets in the northern skies. As part of this shift, NASA has announced a handful of fascinating new planets turned up by TESS, including a couple of worlds in categories which have never been seen before. Farewell Kepler, Welcome TESS Our Book is out! Audio Podcast version: ITunes: RSS: What Fraser's Watching Playlist: Weekly email newsletter: : Astronomy Cast Support us at: More stories at: Twitch: Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / Fraser Cain @karlaii / Karla Thompson - Chad Weber - References: Tess first year New Explorer Mission Chooses the ‘Just-Right’ Orbit TESS Finds Its Smallest Planet Yet A Tiny Planet Confirmation of Toasty TESS Planet Leads to Surprising Find of Promising World hNASA’s TESS Mission Scores ‘Hat Trick’ With 3 New Worlds

Farewell Kepler. Welcome TESS And The Quest To Find Earth 2.0


We’re now entering the final days for NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope. It’s running out of fuel and already crippled by the loss of its reaction wheels. In just a few months NASA will shut it down for good. That is sad, but don’t worry, NASA’s next planet hunting spacecraft, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Telescope is on the launchpad and ready to fly to space to take over where Kepler left off. Finding Earth-sized worlds in the Milky Way. Sign up to my weekly email newsletter: Support us at:Support us at: : More stories at Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: Google+ - Instagram - Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com /Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001

An artist’s illustration of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite.

Credits: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Illustration of the transit method, where a planet passes directly in front of its star, dimming it slightly. Credit: NASA

Artist’s impression of CHEOPS. Credit: University of Bern

ESA’s CHEOPS mission is due for launch later this year (2019), it will perform follow on observations of candidate exoplanets discovered so far, trying to narrow down their size and orbital periods. Thanks to CHEOPS, the number of confirmed exoplanets will start to catch up with the number of planetary candidates.

The Planet-Hunting TESS Discovers Its Smallest Exoplanet to Date

The three planets discovered in the L98-59 system by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite are compared to Mars and Earth in order of increasing size in this illustration. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


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NASA’s TESS Watched an Outburst from Comet 46P/Wirtanen

TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, has imaged an outburst from the comet 46P/Wirtanen. It caught the outburst in what NASA is calling the clearest images yet of a comet outburst from start to finish. A comet outburst is a significant but temporary increase in the comet’s activity, outside of the normal sunlight-driven vaporization of ices that creates a comet’s coma and tail.

his animation shows an explosive outburst of dust, ice and gases from comet 46P/Wirtanen that occurred on September 26, 2018 and dissipated over the next 20 days. The images, from NASA’s TESS spacecraft, were taken every three hours during the first three days of the outburst. Credits: Farnham et al./NASA

This 2013 Hubble Space Telescope image of comet ISON shows the distinct parts of a comet. The round coma around ISON’s nucleus is blueand the tail has a redder hue. Ice and gas in the coma reflect blue light from the Sun, while dust grains in the tail reflect more red light than blue light. Image Credit: , By ESA/Hubble, CC BY 4.0 Wikipedia

IMAGE sequence showing the outburst’s effect on Wirtanen’s coma. Panels (2) and (3) bracket the onset of the outburst (September 26.12) and (4)–(6) show the bright central condensation and the rapidly expanding gas cloud. Each panel is 400,000 km across, with north up and east to the left. The light blue circle denotes a 25,000 km radius aperture. Image Credit: Farnham et al, 2019.

An artist’s diagram of a comet showing the gas tail, the dust tail, and the dust trail. Image Credit: By NASA Ames Research Center/K. Jobse, P. Jenniskens


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Articles on the Tess mission from Universetoday.com

Breakthrough Listen and NASA Team Up to Look for Signs of Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence!

It Seems Impossible, But Somehow This Planet Survived its Star’s Red Giant Phase

TESS Has Now Captured Almost the Entire Southern Sky. Here’s a Mosaic Made of 15,347 Photographs


Articles on the Tess mission









PDFs

“The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite: Simulations of Planet Detections and Astrophysical False Positives” (PDF)

TESS DELIVERS ITS FIRST EARTH-SIZED PLANET AND A WARM SUB-NEPTUNE∗ (PDF)

TESS_HABITABLE_ZONE (PDF)

A Revised Exoplanet Yield from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) (PDF)

Videos

First Earth Like Planet Confirmed by NASA's New Telescope TESS

You can buy Universe Sandbox 2 game here: Hello and welcome! My name is Anton and in this video, we will talk about a detection of the first Earth like planet by TESS telescope. : Find all of the data you can analyze yourself here And the detection paper is here: Support this channel on Patreon to help me make this a full time job: Space Engine is available for free here: Enjoy and please subscribe. Twitter: Facebook: Twitch: Bitcoins to spare? Donate them here to help this channel grow! 1GFiTKxWyEjAjZv4vsNtWTUmL53HgXBuvu The hardware used to record these videos: CPU: Video Card: Motherboard: RAM: PSU: Case: Microphone: Mixer: Recording and Editing:

TESS Discovers Its Tiniest World To Date

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered a world between the sizes of Mars and Earth orbiting a bright, cool, nearby star. The planet, called L 98-59b, marks the smallest found by TESS yet. Two other worlds orbit the same star. While all three planets' sizes are known, further study with other telescopes will be needed to determine if they have atmospheres and, if so, which gases are present. The L 98-59 worlds nearly double the number of small exoplanets -- that is, planets beyond our solar system -- that have the best potential for this kind of follow-up. L 98-59b is around 80 Earth's size and about 10 smaller than the previous record holder discovered by TESS. Its host star, L 98-59, is an M dwarf about one-third the mass of the Sun and lies about 35 light-years away in the southern constellation Volans. While L 98-59b is a record for TESS, even smaller planets have been discovered in data collected by NASA's Kepler satellite, including Kepler-37b, which is only 20 larger than the Moon. The two other worlds in the system, L 98-59c and L 98-59d, are respectively around 1.4 and 1.6 times Earth's size. All three were discovered by TESS using transits, periodic dips in the star's brightness caused when each planet passes in front of it. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Chris Smith (USRA): producer and lead animator - Jeanette Kazmierczak (UMCP): Science Writer Music: "Autumn Rush" from Killer Tracks Read more: This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: If you liked this video, subscribe to: the NASA Goddard YouTube channel Follow NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center · Instagram · Goddard Twitter · Goddard pix Twitter · Facebook: · Flickr

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