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William Bacon's Space Launch sub-page Page Index


Current status of the deep space network


This section for launching into space!

Space Shuttle Timeline

To start exploring space, you must go into space!

And here is Launch Library.net track all launches!!!!!!




Incredible Photo Captures The 'Dark Side' Of The Moon

In a Wednesday release accompanying the image, NASA notes that humans had never seen the far side of the moon
(often called the "dark side," though it gets plenty of sunlight) until 1959, when the Soviet Luna 3 captured the first-ever images.
Eagle-eyed readers might notice a faint green outline on the right side of the moon above,
which NASA explains has to do with the way EPIC processes photos:

Click here for A Video montage of all 135 shuttle launches

Take a virtual tour of the Suttle discovery's Mid-Deck!

Tour the Shuttle Discovery's Mid-Deck!


What started it all Verner Van Braun's Proposal.


Verner Van Braun's Proposal from Collier's Magazine, 1952

Verner Van Braun's Proposal from Collier's Magazine, 1952, Artist Impresion of a launch

Verner Van Braun's Proposal from Collier's Magazine, 1952, Artist Impresion of the Orbiter in Orbit

Verner Van Braun - 1954

Angela Zander • 9 hours ago #Space #Flight Take a look at the crewed spaceships that have launched astronauts and cosmonauts into space
during the first 50 years of human spaceflight in this SPACE.com infographic.

The Russian Shuttle Launch System

J. E. Bruce saved to Illuminating The Space Age 25 Years of Buran (via Daniel Marin - Eurekablog) 23h

Soviet Energiya launch vehicle

Resuable Launchers


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The Defense Department's X-37B Spaceplane (Un-Crewed) from Space.com

The x-37B Space Plane

The x-37B Orbital Test Vehicle is an unmanned space test vehicle for the USAF.
Source Space.com: All about our solar system, outer space and exploration

Photos: X-37B Space Plane - The Orbital Test Vehicle

Fourth flight of the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle is set for blastoff on May 20, 2015 from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Credit: Boeing

The x-37B Space Plane has returned:
SUPER SECRET X-37B NEARS ONE YEAR IN ORBIT DOING ???

The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle taxiing on the flightline on March 30th, 2010, at the Astrotech facility in Titusville, Florida.
Credit: USAF

An artists’ conception of the X-37B in Earth orbit. Credit: USAF


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The Delta 4 Heavy Typical Mission

The June 9 launch of the ULA Delta 4 Heavy carrying the classified NROL-37 spy satellite is
planned for 1:59 p.m. EDT. Broadcast starts at 1:39 p.m. EDT Watch the live webcast:

Delta 4 Heavy in the Assembly Hall

Side view shows trio of Common Booster Cores (CBCs) with RS-68 engines powering the Delta IV Heavy rocket resting horizontally
in ULA’s (United Launch Alliance) HIF processing facility at Cape Canaveral that will launch NASA’s maiden Orion on the EFT-1
mission in December 2014 from Launch Complex 37.
Credit: Ken Kremer

Delta IV Heavy NROL-37 Payload Mate

Published on May 24, 2016 The NROL-37 payload is mated to a Delta IV Heavy rocket inside the Mobile Service Tower or MST
at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex-37. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

SURVEILLANCE SATELLITE SET FOR JUNE 9 LAUNCH ON MIGHTY DELTA 4 HEAVY

Sun rises behind Delta 4 Heavy launch of NROL-15 for the NRO on June 29, 2012 from Cape Canaveral Air Force
Station at Space Launch Complex-37.
Credit: Ken Kremer

WORLD’S LARGEST ROCKET READY TO RUMBLE SATURDAY WITH SECRET NRO SPY SATELLITE – WATCH LIVE

Flock of 5 pelicans fly close recon over unveiled Delta 4 Heavy rocket set to launch NROL-37 spy satellite
to orbit on June 11, 2016 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at Space Launch Complex-37. Credit: Ken Kremer

Delta IV Heavy - Pre-Launch 06-09-2016

Published on Jun 9, 2016 UlA is launching the 2.1 million lbs thrust "Heavy". We are a US disabled veteran run, non profit video production company
who's mission is to bring other disabled US Veterans to witness a launch, experience US Space History and become part of our report.
Our nonprofit 501(c)(3) is 100% tax deductible, just go to our webpage
which is merged with and find our Donate button. You can help change the life of a US Veteran. Thank You Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

Delta 4 Heavy cutaway diagram. Credit: ULA

I G N I T I ON !!!!!!

Ignition and liftoff … United Launch Alliance Delta 4 Heavy rocket blasts off with NROL-37 spy satellite on June 11, 2016
from Space Launch Complex-37 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fl.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

Photos: Delta 4-Heavy launch as seen from press site
Photos by Alex Polimeni/Spaceflight Now

The Following two images CREDIT United Launch Alliance (ULA)

Photos: Delta 4-Heavy launch as seen from press site
Photos by Alex Polimeni/Spaceflight Now

The June 11, 2016 Launch of NROL-37 Members of the news media — reporters and photographers — witnessed the United Launch Alliance
Delta 4-Heavy rocket lifted off from the ITL Causeway on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, about 1.7 miles from the pad. Photos by Alex Polimeni/Spaceflight Now

Possible Orbits for NROL 37


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The MUOS-5 Mission Typical Atlas 5 Launch

MUOS-5 mission logo. Credit:ULA

Mission Profile

Atlas V MUOS-5 Launch Highlights

ULA MUOS 5 launch 24 June 2016

Published on Jun 25, 2016 The sounds and fury of a ULA Atlas V 551 rocket blast off carrying Lockheed Martin built MUOS-5
tactical communications satellite to geosynchronous orbit for US Navy on June 24, 2016 at 10:30 a.m. EDT
from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fl, as seen in this up close video from
remote camera positioned at pad. Credit: Ken Kremer Category People & Blogs License Standard YouTube License

The Navy’s fifth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) is encapsulated inside an Atlas V five-meter diameter payload fairing. Credit:United Launch Alliance

United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket poised for launch on MUOS-5 mission from Space Launch Complex-41 on June 24, 2016.
Credit: Lane Hermann

Blastoff of United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket on MUOS-5 mission from Space Launch Complex-41 on June 24, 2016.
Credit: Lane Hermann

A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the MUOS-5 mission lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 10:30 a.m. EDT on June 24, 2016.
Credit: Credit:United Launch Alliance

Long plume from MUOS-5 Atlas V Launch by United Launch Alliance from Space Launch Complex-41 on June 24, 2016.
Credit: Michael Seeley

Artist’s concept of a MUOS satellite in orbit. Credit: Lockheed Martin


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Orion's First flight The Future???


Possible Timeline of the EM-1?

NASA’s Exploration Mission-1

Published on Dec 9, 2015 NASA is hard at work building the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System rocket and the ground systems needed to send astronauts into deep space. The agency is developing the core capabilities needed to enable the journey to Mars. On Exploration Mission-1, the spacecraft will travel thousands of miles beyond the moon over the course of about a three-week mission. HD download link: Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

NASA’s Space Launch System View of the Assembly machinery

Wide view of the new welding tool at the Vertical Assembly Center at
NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans at a ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 12, 2014.
Credit Ken Kremer

NASA’s Space Launch System Block 1 On the crawler

Artist concept of the Block I configuration of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS).
The SLS Program has completed its critical design review, and the program has concluded
that the core stage of the rocket will remain orange along with the Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter,
which is the natural color of the insulation that will cover those elements.
Credits: NASA

NASA’s Space Launch System View of the Future Launch Pad

View of NASA’s future SLS/Orion launch pad at Space Launch Complex 39B from atop Mobile Launcher at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
Former Space Shuttle launch pad 39B is now undergoing renovations and upgrades to prepare for SLS/Orion flights starting in 2018.
Credit Ken Kremer

NASA’s Space Launch System View of the Exhaust hole

Looking up from beneath the enlarged exhaust hole of the Mobile Launcher to the 380 foot-tall tower
astronauts will ascend as their gateway for missions to the Moon, Asteroids and Mars.
The ML will support NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft during Exploration Mission-1
at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit Ken Kremer

America's Next Rocket as of September 4, 2016

NASA’s Space Launch System, or SLS, will be the most powerful rocket in history. The flexible, evolvable design of this advanced,
heavy-lift launch vehicle will meet a variety of crew and cargo mission needs.
In addition to carrying the Orion spacecraft, SLS will transfer important cargo, equipment and science experiments
to deep space, providing the nation with a safe, affordable and sustainable means to expand our reach in the solar system.
It will allow astronauts aboard Orion to explore multiple deep-space destinations including an asteroid and ultimately Mars.
The first configuration of the SLS launch vehicle will have a 70-metric-ton (77-ton) lift capacity and carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft
beyond low-Earth orbit to test the performance of the integrated system. As the SLS is evolved,
it will be the most powerful rocket ever built and provide an unprecedented lift capability of 130 metric tons (143 tons)
to enable missions even farther into our solar system. Image Credit: NASA Last Updated: July 30, 2015 Editor: Sarah Loff

Boeing has a great booklet on their Boeing's Booklet on the sls Rocket

A great reference on Space Nuclear Power!

NASA Orion spacecraft blasts off atop 1st Space Launch System rocket in 2018 –
attached to European provided service module – on an enhanced uncrewed mission to Deep Space where an asteroid could be visited in the mid 2020s.
Credit: NASA

NASA’s Space Launch System Passes Critical Design Review, Drops Saturn V Color Motif by KEN KREMER on OCTOBER 24, 2015

Artist concept of the SLS Block 1 configuration on the Mobile Launcher at KSC. Credit: NASA/MSFC

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) blasts off from launch pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
in this artist rendering showing a view of the liftoff of the Block 1 70-metric-ton (77-ton) crew vehicle configuration.
Credit: NASA/MSFC Story/imagery updated

NASA’s Space Launch System Paving the way for deep space exploration

The core stage (first stage) of the SLS will be powered by four RS-25 engines and a pair of five-segment solid rocket boosters (SRBs)
that will generate a combined 8.4 million pounds of liftoff thrust in its inaugural Block 1 configuration, with a minimum 70-metric-ton (77-ton)
lift capability.

Artist conception of a SLS Launch

@nasaorion spacecraft will launch on the Space Launch system (the largest spacecraft every built, even bigger than the Saturn V rocket!). Both are under construction @nasa currently, and this is the spacecraft that will take us beyond the low earth orbit of the International Space Station, whether that be the Moon, Mars, or beyond. We will conduct test missions with astronauts on Orion in the early 2020s, and a first mission will take us 40,000 miles beyond the Moon!

NASA’s Space Launch System Block 1 exploded view

Graphic shows Block I configuration of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS). Credits: NASA/MSFC


First Manned Flight of NASA’s Orion Deep Space Capsule Could Slip to 2023
by KEN KREMER on SEPTEMBER 17, 2015


ISRO(Indian Space Research Organisation) successfully tested its GSLV Mk III cryogenic engine

The Indian Space Research Organisation (#ISRO ) successfully conducted a test on Saturday Mar. 14 2015
to check the GSLV Mk III launch vehicle�s indigenous cryogenic CE-20 engine at ISRO Propulsion Complex (IPRC)
in Mahendragiri, Tirunelveli district. The test is just the latest step toward providing the ISRO with the
capability of sending astronauts to low-Earth orbit (LEO).


Inside Japan's Huge Space Truck


Is this the future Launch System?


And the future?????




THe Bigelow Corporation

United Launch Alliance

Rendering of the ULA Vulcan rocket blasting off. United Launch Alliance (ULA) next generation rocket is set to make its debut flight in 2019. Credit: ULA


From Pratt and Whitney

It's future space usa.com

From DARPA it's The 100 year star ship project!

WEBCAST REPLAY: SpaceX Lands Falcon 9 After Space Launch! by SPACE.com Staff | December 21, 2015 10:00pm ET

UPDATE for 8:53 pm ET: SpaceX appears to have successfully landed a Falcon 9 rocket back on Earth after launching into orbit!
The company also successfully launched all 11 ORBCOMM satellites during the historic spaceflight.

Falcon Heavy | Flight Animation

Published on Jan 27, 2015 When Falcon Heavy lifts off later this year, it will be the most powerful operational rocket in the world by a factor of two.
Thrust at liftoff is equal to approximately eighteen 747 aircraft operating simultaneously.
Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

Spacex's Falcon Heavy


How It Works: The Most Powerful Space Rocket. When the firm SpaceX launches its Falcon Heavy rocket
into space late this year, the craft will become the mightiest rocket in the world. Only NASA’s Saturn V,
which sent Americans to the moon, has ever generated more power. In rockets, the most important measure of power is thrust.
Falcon Heavy’s 27 individual booster engines together generate 3.8 million pounds of thrust—enough to lift the 3.1-million-pound rocket
and its 117,000-pound payload toward low-Earth orbit. The rocket's success is critical for both SpaceX and the U.S. space program:
The Air Force has already hired SpaceX and its Falcon Heavy to send two satellites into orbit sometime in 2015.


Peek Inside The SpaceX Falcon Heavy will be the world's most powerful rocket when it launches later this year.
It can carry a payload of up to 117,000 pounds in its clamshell fairing. The fairing is shown here open with the payload exposed,
but on a mission it would remain closed until the first stage has separated and the second stage has nearly reached orbit.


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NASA’S FIRST SLS MARS ROCKET TEST MISSION

Aerojet Rocketdyne technicians inspect the engine controller that will be used for the first integrated flight of NASA’s Space Launch System and Orion in late 2018. The engine controller was installed on RS-25 development engine no. 0528 for testing at Stennis Space Center on the A-2 Test Stand on March 23, 2017. The RS-25 engine, with the flight controller, was test fired for a full-duration 500 seconds. Credits: NASA/SSC The post NASA Test Fires New Engine Controlling ‘Brain’ for First SLS MegaRocket Mission appeared first on Universe Today.

NASA engineers successfully conducted a development test of the RS-25 rocket engine Thursday, Aug. 18 2016
at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The RS-25 will help power the core stage
of the agency’s new Space Launch System (SLS) rocket for the journey to Mars. Credit: Ken Kremer/

NASA’S FIRST SLS MARS ROCKET FUEL TANK COMPLETES WELDING

Welding is complete on the largest piece of the core stage that will provide the fuel for the first flight of NASA's new rocket,
the Space Launch System, with the Orion spacecraft in 2018. The core stage liquid hydrogen tank has completed welding
on the Vertical Assembly Center at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.
Credit: NASA/MAF/Steven Seipel

Welding is complete on the largest piece of the core stage that will provide the fuel for the first flight of NASA's new rocket,
the Space Launch System, with the Orion spacecraft in 2018. The core stage liquid hydrogen tank has completed welding
on the Vertical Assembly Center at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.
Credit: NASA/MAF/Steven Seipel

The liquid hydrogen tank qualification test article for NASA’s new Space Launch System (SLS)
heavy lift rocket lies horizontally after final welding was completed at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility
in New Orleans in July 2016. Credit: Ken Kremer/

The first liquid hydrogen tank, also called the qualification test article, for NASA’s new Space Launch System (SLS)
heavy lift rocket lies horizontally beside the Vertical Assembly Center robotic weld machine on July 22, 2016
after final welding was just completed at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. Credit: Ken Kremer/

The newly assembled first liquid hydrogen tank, also called the qualification test article,
for NASA’s new Space Launch System (SLS) heavy lift rocket lies horizontally beside the
Vertical Assembly Center robotic weld machine (blue) on July 22, 2016.
It was lifted out of the welder (top)
after final welding was just completed at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

The ULA Delta Mariner barge arriving in Port Canaveral, Florida on March 7, 2017 after transporting the interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) hardware for the first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket from Decatur, Alabama. SLS-1 launch from the Kennedy Space Center is slated for late 2018. Credit: Ken Kremer/

The interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) for first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket arrived at Port Canaveral, Florida on March 7, 2017 loaded inside a shipping canister (right) aboard the ULA Delta Mariner barge that set sail from Decatur, Alabama a week ago. The ICPS shared the shipping voyage along with a ULA Delta IV first stage rocket core seen at left. Credit: Ken Kremer/

The interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) for the first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket has arrived by way of barge at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on March 7, 2017. The ICPS will be moved to United Launch Alliance’s Delta IV Operation Center at the Cape for processing for the SLS-1/Orion EM-1 launch currently slated for late 2018 launch from pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Credit: ULA

Orion crew module pressure vessel for NASA’s Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) is unveiled for the first time on Feb. 3, 2016 after arrival at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. It is secured for processing in a test stand called the birdcage in the high bay inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building at KSC. Launch to the Moon is slated in 2018 atop the SLS rocket. Credit: Ken Kremer/

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) blasts off from launch pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
in this artist rendering showing a view of the liftoff of the Block 1 70-metric-ton (77-ton) crew vehicle configuration.
Credit: NASA/MSFC


First Manned Flight of NASA’s Orion Deep Space Capsule Could Slip to 2023
by KEN KREMER on SEPTEMBER 17, 2015


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The GOES-R Logo

IN THE CLEANROOM WITH GAME CHANGING GOES-R NEXT GEN WEATHER SATELLITE
LAUNCHING NOV. 19, 2016

The NASA/NOAA GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R Series) being processed at
Astrotech Space Operations, in Titusville, FL, in advance of planned launch on a ULA Atlas V slated for Nov. 19, 2016.
GOES-R will be America’s most advanced weather satellite. Credit: Ken Kremer/

The NASA/NOAA GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R Series) being processed at
Astrotech Space Operations, in Titusville, FL, in advance of planned launch on a ULA Atlas V slated for Nov. 19, 2016.
GOES-R will be America’s most advanced weather satellite. Credit: Ken Kremer/

The NASA/NOAA/Lockheed Martin/Harris GOES-R team gives a big thumbs up for the dramatic leap in capability
this next gen weather observation satellite will provide – during media briefing at Astrotech Space Operations,
in Titusville, FL. Launch is set for Nov. 19, 2016. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Track mobile used to push ULS Atlas V and NASA/NOAA GOES-R to pad 41 from VIF processing facility. Credit: Lane Hermann

SUNSET SATURDAY BLASTOFF OF GOES-R SET TO DELIVER QUANTUM LEAP IN WEATHER FORECASTING ON NOV. 19, 2016

The NASA/NOAA GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series) is poised for launch
on a ULA Atlas V from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Nov. 19, 2016. GOES-R will be America’s most advanced weather satellite.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

The NASA/NOAA GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series)
is encapsulated in the nose cone of a ULA Atlas V set for launch from Space Launch Complex-41
on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Nov. 19, 2016. GOES-R will be America’s most advanced weather satellite.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket launches the advanced new GOES-R weather satellite into orbit
from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Nov. 19, 2016.
Credit: United Launch Alliance

Launch of NASA/NOAA GOES-R weather observatory on ULA Atlas V on Nov. 19, 2016 from pad 41
on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.
Credit: Julian Leek

Blastoff of revolutionary NASA/NOAA GOES-R weather satellite on ULA Atlas V on Nov. 19, 2016
as seen from remote camera at Space Launch Complex 41 (SLC-41) on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.
GOES-R will deliver a quantum leap in America’s weather forecasting capabilities. Credit: Ken Kremer/

Blastoff of revolutionary NASA/NOAA GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series)
on a ULA Atlas V from Space Launch Complex 41 (SLC-41) on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Nov. 19, 2016
– as seen from the VAB roof. GOES-R will soon deliver a quantum leap in America’s weather forecasting capabilities.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

Blastoff of revolutionary NASA/NOAA GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series)
on a ULA Atlas V from Space Launch Complex 41 (SLC-41) on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Nov. 19, 2016
– as seen from the VAB roof. GOES-R will soon deliver a quantum leap in America’s weather forecasting capabilities.
Credit: Ken Kremer/

Launch of NASA/NOAA GOES-R weather observatory on ULA Atlas V on Nov. 19, 2016 from pad 41
on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, as seen from Playalinda beach.
Credit: Jillian Laudick

Launch of NASA/NOAA GOES-R weather observatory on ULA Atlas V on Nov. 19, 2016 from pad 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida,
as seen from Playalinda beach. Credit: Jillian Laudick

Launch of NASA/NOAA GOES-R weather observatory on ULA Atlas V on Nov. 19, 2016 from pad 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, as seen from Playalinda beach. Credit: Jillian Laudick

Atlas V/GOES-R launch as seen rising over neighbor houses in Titusville, Florida on Nov. 19, 2016. Credit: Melissa Bayles

ULA Atlas V rocket and GOES-R weather observatory streak to orbit from launch pad 41 at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Credit: Julian Leek

The GOES-R satellite streaks into space aboard an Atlas V rocket in this long-exposure view of its successful launch
from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Nov. 19, 2016.
Credit: United Launch Alliance

GOES-R weather observation satellite instrument suite. Credit: NASA/NOAA

First "Light"

NEW AGE IN WEATHER FORECASTING BEGINS WITH SPECTACULAR 1ST IMAGES FROM NASA/NOAA GOES-16(was GOES-R) OBSERVATORY

GOES-16 (previously known as GOES-R) captured this view of the moon as it looked across the surface of the Earth on January 15, 2017. Like earlier GOES satellites, GOES-16 will use the moon for calibration. Credit: NOAA/NASA

This image clearly shows the significant storm system that crossed North America that caused freezing and ice that resulted in dangerous conditions across the United States on January 15, 2017 resulting in loss of life. Credit: NOAA/NASA

This composite color full-disk visible image shows North and South America and was taken on January 15, 2017. It was created using several of the 16 spectral channels available on the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument. Credit: NOAA/NASA

This 16-panel image shows the continental United States in the two visible, four near-infrared and 10 infrared channels on the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). These channels help forecasters distinguish between differences in the atmosphere like clouds, water vapor, smoke, ice and volcanic ash. Credit: NOAA/NASA

Northeast Coast and New York Metropolitan region. On January 15, 2017 severe weather moved across the central United States before passing through the Northeast on the 16th and 17th where it resulted in wet and wintry weather for travelers across the region. Credit: NOAA/NASA

From 22,300 miles (35,900 kilometers) above Earth, GOES-16 will not only improve the precision of forecasts but also add to Earth's overall weather observation network, NOAA researchers said. GOES-16's updated instruments will enable it to take photographs with an image resolution four times higher than those taken by existing GOES spacecraft, the agency added.


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FUTURE SPACE LAUNCHING SYSTEMS

ARCA UNVEILS THE WORLD’S FIRST SINGLE-STAGE-TO-ORBIT ROCKET

Artist's impression of the Haas 2CA deployed to orbit. Credit: ARCA

Artist’s impression of the Haas 2C rocket ascending into orbit. Credit: ARCA

Artist’s impression of the Haas 2C rocket, shown in its launch (top) and deployment configurations (bottom). Credit: ARCA

Published on Mar 29, 2017 Introducing the Haas 2CA Single-Stage-to-Orbit rocket. Outfitted with lightweight composite materials and the Executor aerospike engine, the Haas 2CA will be the first rocket in history to place itself into Earth's orbit as a single stage. Find out more at HAAS ARCA
Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

THE AEROSPIKE ENGINE WAS CONSIDERED FOR THE SHUTTLE, BUT NEVER FLEW. THAT’S ABOUT TO CHANGE

Artist's impression of the Demonstrator 3 aerospike test vehicle and the Haas 2CA SSTO rocket. Credit: ARCA

The test of twin Linear Aerospike XRS-2200 engines, originally built for the X-33 program, was performed on August 6, 2001 at NASA’s Sternis Space Center, Mississippi. Credit: NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

Haas 2CA - Orbital Flight Redefined

Published on Mar 29, 2017 Introducing the Haas 2CA Single-Stage-to-Orbit rocket. Outfitted with lightweight composite materials and the Executor aerospike engine, the Haas 2CA will be the first rocket in history to place itself into Earth's orbit as a single stage. Find out more at arcaspace.com Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License

Published on Jun 15, 2017 ARCA will soon launch an aerospike rocket engine into space. This will be the first linear aerospike to be tested in flight, and will increase the flight readiness level of ARCA's Haas 2CA single-stage-to-orbit rocket. Find out more about the Demonstrator 3 at arcaspace.com Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License


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