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William Bacon's Habitable Zone subpage Page Index


WITH ALL THESE NEW PLANETS FOUND IN THE HABITABLE ZONE,
MAYBE IT’S TIME TO FINE TUNE THE HABITABLE ZONE

A more comprehensive habitable zone for finding life on other planets (PDF)
from the cornell University Library

Artist’s impression of how an an Earth-like exoplanet might look. Credit: ESO.

A diagram depicting the Habitable Zone (HZ) boundaries, and how the boundaries are affected by star type. Credit: Wikipedia Commons/Chester Harman

Diagram showing GJ 625’s habitable zone in comparison’s to the Sun’s. Credit: IAC

Stellar temperature versus distance from the star compared to Earth for the classic habitable zone (shaded blue) and the volcanic habitable zone extension Credit: R. Ramirez, Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell


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Looking to the future, NASA and other space agencies have high hopes for the field of extra-solar planet research. In the past decade, the number of known exoplanets has reached just shy of 4000, and many more are expected to be found once next-generations telescopes are put into service. And with so many exoplanets to study, research goals have slowly shifted away from the process of discovery and towards characterization.

What Is The Habitable Zone?

We've found hundreds of exoplanets in the galaxy. But only a few of them have just the right combination of factors to hold life like Earth's.

The “Goldilocks” zone around a star is where a planet is neither too hot nor too cold to support liquid water. Credit: Petigura/UC Berkeley, Howard/UH-Manoa, Marcy/UC Berkeley.

Exoplanet Kepler 62f would need an atmosphere rich in carbon dioxide for water to be in liquid form. Artist’s Illustration: NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Artist’s depiction of a waterworld. A new study suggests that Earth is in a minority when it comes to planets, and that most habitable planets may be greater than 90% ocean. Credit: David A. Aguilar (CfA)

Artist’s impression of Sirius A (a main-sequence type A star) and Sirius B (white dwarf companion). Credit: NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)

Artist’s concept of Earth-like exoplanets, which (according to new research) need to strike the careful balance between water and landmass. Credit: NASA


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ARTICLES on the habitable zone

HABITABLE ZONE PREDICTIONS AND HOW TO TEST THEM (PDF)


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